How To Put On Your Socks

I have customers call and tell me they would like a stocking with a zipper because they are not able to put on (don) their stockings or socks. You would think it would be a lot easier with a zipper, but it really is not. It takes 3-yes three hands to put on a zippered stocking. It takes two hands to hold the zipper together and one to zip the stocking. The zipper tends to slide down on the zippered stockings and the top of the zipper can dig into the leg causing a sore. Other customers express their desire to “step back” in compression (i.e. from a 20-30 to a 15-20 mmHg compression). This is not necessarily a good idea. You would not be following your physician’s orders and you would not be getting proper compression for your diagnosis. This should be a last-ditch choice when no other methods work.
First I suggest they follow the directions which we send with each and every order. If you have misplaced yours, here they are again:
Turn back the top of the stocking onto itself. Usually this is down to nearly the heel pocket.
Place your foot (toes pointed if possible) in the stocking until it meets resistance. With both hands grab the stocking on each side of your ankle and pull towards you body until it meets resistance.
donning3
Fold the stocking back onto itself, grab at the sides at the top of the fold and pull towards your body. Repeat the fold back and pulling procedure again until the garment is positioned correctly on your leg.
donning6
Smooth out any wrinkles and adjust the heel and ankle area for comfort.The top of knee-high stockings should be two finger widths below the crease at the back of your knee. Thigh high stockings should be two to four finger widths below you groin. With knee-high and thigh high garments, never pull on top band. This will break the threads on the band. Stockings will wrinkle and move throughout the day. Check your stockings periodically to smooth out any wrinkles. It is not unusual to need to adjust your compression socks or compression stockings at least three times a day. Don’t just pull on the top of the garment. Fold the stocking in half, place your thumbs inside the garment next to your leg and pull up. Repeat until the stocking is back in place.

 

SigvarisDonningGloves
If this method does not work, I recommend the Sigvaris Donning Gloves I call them my “Magic Green Gloves”. They give me greater strength in my fingers. The rough “nubbies” on the gloves enable you to “pinch and pull” your stockings up. You can also rub up and down your leg so the fullness of the garment is distributed even on the leg.
JobstAndMediDonners

 

Several of our manufacturers including Jobst and Medi make metal framed Donners which stretch the stocking open and enable you to “almost” just step into the stocking.

There are many other methods we use to enable you to get your support socks or support stockings on. Give us a chance to work with you and find a method which works for you so you can remain compliant with your doctor’s orders.

Remember, support socks or support stockings do you no good if they sit in your dresser drawer.

We hope we can make your life easier,

Vanda

We’re sorry…these donning devices will soon be on SupportHosePlus.com. Until they are, please call our toll-free number, 1-844-472-8807, to order.

Let’s Keep Your Legs Looking Great

EnlargedVeinAndDamagedVein

Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI) is one of the leading causes of swollen feet, ankles, and legs. There are several things that can cause CVI. In CVI the butterfly valves which help blood move from the lower extremity back to the heart are damaged (incompetent) and do not close properly. Ultimately long-term blood pressure in the leg veins that is higher than normal causes CVI. Prolonged sitting or standing can stretch the superficial vein walls and damage the valves. Compression stockings and compression socks help the veins to close by applying a specific amount of pressure to the leg (this is the compression which your physician recommends). The compression stockings and compression socks also work with the muscles of the lower extremity to act as a secondary heart pump to move the blood out of the lower extremity and back to the heart.

  • Ankle swelling
  • Tight feeling calves
  • Heavy, tired, restless or achy legs
  • Pain while walking or shortly after stopping

At the end of the day, someone with CVI may experience only slight swelling and their legs may be tired and heavy. Now is the time to visit your physician and get some compression socks or compression stockings to keep the CVI from becoming worse.

  • Family history of varicose veins
  • Being overweight
  • Not exercising enough
  • Being pregnant
  • Smoking
  • Sitting or standing for long periods of time

If you have a parent who has had varicose veins, if you are overweight, or if you sit or stand for long periods of time, again now is the time to visit your physician and get some compression socks or compression stockings to keep the CVI from becoming worse.

CVI can be diagnosed by your physician by reviewing your patient history and a physical exam. The physician may also measure the blood pressure in your legs and examine any varicose veins you may have. To confirm a diagnosis of CVI, the physician will usually order a duplex ultrasound or a venogram. A duplex ultrasound uses sound waves to measure the speed of blood flow and visualizes the structure of the leg veins. A venogram is an x-ray that uses a dye (contrast) which enables the physician to see the veins.

Chronic venous insufficiency is usually not considered a health risk; your physician will try to decrease your pain and disability. In mild cases of CVI, compression stockings or compression socks may alleviate the discomfort and swelling. Physicians usually use a 20-30mmHg compression stocking or a 20-30mmHg compression sock for this. The stockings will not make the varicosities go away, but is the least invasive treatment.

Chronic Venous Insufficiency

More serious cases of Chronic Venous Insufficiency require sclerotherapy, ablation, or surgical intervention such as stripping to correct the problematic vein. This is usually done by a vascular specialist or vascular surgeon. During sclerotherapy a chemical is injected in the affected vein or veins and a scar will form from the inside of the vein. During ablation a thin, flexible tube (catheter) with an electrode at the tip will heat the vein walls at the appropriate location to seal the vein. When a vein stripping is done one of the saphenous veins is removed. The physician will make a small incision in the groin area and usually another in the calf below the knee. The veins associated with the saphenous vein will be disconnected and tied off and the vein removed. There are other surgical procedures which are done to improve your leg health. After one of the above procedures 20-30mmHg compression stockings are usually put on and you are told to wear them for a certain length of time. Some physicians will tell their patients on their follow-up visit that it is no longer necessary to wear the compression garments. For me, this is where I have some concerns. If the real underlining cause of CVI (such as family history of varicose veins, being overweight, not exercising enough, smoking or sitting or standing for long periods of time) has not been corrected why would you not continue to wear compression stockings to keep from developing CVI again.

Compression stockings and socks have come a long way in the last few years. They no longer look like the garments our grandparents wore. They look like ordinary stockings and socks and can improve the quality of life. The stigma of wearing compression garments is in the past.

Let’s wear our compression stockings and socks to keep our legs looking great!

Vanda

http://www.supporthoseplus.com