March is DVT Awareness Month – Symptoms of DVT

This month is DVT Awareness Month and we have been addressing different aspects of this malady. This week we are looking at symptoms of DVT. While most victims of DVT
(Deep Vein Thrombosis- blood clots in the deep veins) are 60 years or older, DVT can strike anyone – young or old – athlete or sedate – especially if they have risk factors. DVT is the silent killer and may present with minimal symptoms. Age, family history, obesity, immobility, pregnancy, recent surgery or injury to the hips or knees, contraceptive pills, and hormone replacement therapy are some risk factors that make a DVT more likely to occur.

Signs and Symptoms of DVT

  • Pain in the leg or pelvis region
  • Tenderness and swelling of the leg
  • Discoloration of the leg (reddish)
  • Areas of the leg or pelvis region that feel warm to touch
  • Whole leg swelling

Symptoms of DVT can be similar to other conditions, like a pulled muscle or “Charlie horse” and can delay diagnosis. Some people may have no symptoms.

Blood clots are more common in the left leg, possibly because the femoral artery in that leg passes anterior to the vein, and may compress the vein. Symptoms of a DVT from travel do not always develop immediately after travel, but more likely within three days of arrival at your destination.Symptoms may not manifest themselves for up to two weeks after a long trip

Potential complication of a DVT is the possibility of a Pulmonary Embolism (PE). A PE happens when a piece of the blood clot breaks off and travels through the bloodstream and becomes lodged in the lung.

Signs and Symptoms of Pulmonary Embolism

  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Chest pain-sharp, stabbing: may get worse with deep breath
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Unexplained cough, sometimes with bloody mucus

If you suspect a pulmonary embolism, call 911 or go to the nearest ER. Having this knowledge could save your life!

If you have associated risk factors, or want to help prevent the risk of developing a blood clot, it is important to wear gradient compression hose especially during travel due to prolonged immobility. Stockings also help to relieve swelling, pain and post thrombotic syndrome (PTS). PTS is a late complication of DVT in which signs and symptoms may include pain, edema, hyperpigmentation and skin ulceration. DVT treatments include anticoagulant medicines and surgery. If you want to help prevent the occurrence of a DVT you should look at your risk factors, exercise your legs, wear loose-fitting clothing, keep hydrated with water and wear graduated compression stockings.

You should become familiar with the symptoms of DVT so you may be your own activist.

Save a friend or loved one – tell them about DVT!

Vanda
PS Since we have the medi sale on, I thought I would share with you some of our favorite styles

medi Sheer and Soft attractive in appearance – only you will know they are medical support hose

medi Comfort  durable, discreet and semi-sheer – easier to don (put on) and doff (take off) because of the latest knitting technology

medi forMen styled and sized for men – available in regular and petite (short) lengthM

March is DVT Awareness Month – Risk Factors

About 2 million people experience DVT each year. It can affect anyone (male or female),at any age without warning. Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism (DVT/PE) are often under diagnosed. They are  serious, but preventable medical conditions. It is to your advantage if you know DVT risk factors. Some of the factors you can change and some of them you cannot.

Following is a list of factors that increase the risk of developing DVT:

  • Injury to a vein, often caused by:
    • Fractures
    • Severe muscle injury
    • Major surgery (especially of the abdomen, pelvis, hip, or legs)
  • Slow blood flow, often caused by:
    • Confinement to bed (possibly due to a medical condition or after surgery)
    • Limited movement (a cast on an extremity to help heal a injured bone)
    • Sitting for a long time, especially with crossed legs
    • Paralysis
    • Sedate lifestyle 

      mediMaternity
  • Increased estrogen:
    • Birth control pills
    • Hormone replacement therapy, sometimes used after menopause
    • Pregnancy, for up to 6 weeks after giving birth
  • Certain Chronic medical illnesses:
    • Heart disease
    • Lung disease
    • Cancer and its treatment
    • Inflammatory bowl disease (Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis)
  • Other facts that increase the risk of DVT include:
    • Previous DVT or PE
    • Family history of DVT or PE
    • Age (risk increases as age increases)
    • Obesity
    • A catheter located in a central vein
    • Inherited clotting disorders
    • Varicose veins

The more risk factors you have, the greater are your chances of developing a DVT. Change the risk factors you can to give yourself a better chance of not developing a DVT. If you have a muscle injury or you are scheduled for surgery, discuss the option of wearing a 20-30mmHg support stockings or support socks to prevent the DVT. When Rod and I have surgery we discuss this with our surgeons and receive their approval to bring our own 20-30mmHg garments (which we know fit correctly) rather than wear their TEDS!

If you have a sedate lifestyle or sit behind a computer, get up and move around at least once an hour. WALK!! WALK!! WALK!! If you have surgery, get up and move as soon as your physician gives you permission. Sometimes that is even the same day as surgery. According to a study from Oxford University, patients recovering from surgery are at a high risk of DVT for much longer than previously thought. In this study, it was found the likelihood of a patient to need hospital treatment for a DVT was 70 time higher than the norm. For those who had day surgery, the risk was 10 times higher than the norm. The danger was highest in the third week post-op, but continued for around 12 weeks.

If you are pregnant, start wearing support hose as soon as you learn of your pregnancy (learning to put them on during your first trimester helps you to put them on in that last trimester) and continue to wear them for at least 6 weeks after delivery. Besides the hormonal changes going on, there is also the weight of the baby on the saphenous veins which can cause decreased blood flow and the risk of DVT. Maternity panty hose not only increase the flow of blood by using gradient compression, but also lift the baby up off the veins and to some degree help the back.

Help keep your friends or loved ones in good health, tell them about DVT and how to prevent in by wearing compression hose or compression socks.

Here are a few tips to help you and your loved ones stay healthy:

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • If you smoke, quite. This is one of the greatest gifts you can give your loved ones.
  • Exercise your legs regularly when sitting or laying for long periods of time…This can be as simple as making figure 8’s with your feet or just walk for a few minutes.
  • When sitting, stretch you legs and change position frequently.
  • Take a deep breath frequently.
  • Elevate you legs whenever possible.
  • Be careful about chairs and leg rests that compress the calf or behind the knee.
  • Avoid excessive alcohol intake (it dehydrates the body).
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Wear loose, non-binding clothes when traveling.
  • If you have family members with multiple DVT’s and they have been diagnosed as having a clotting disorder, consider being tested yourself.
  • If you are having surgery, discuss the possibility of DVT with your surgeon. Many are pleased that you areIf you are having surgery, discuss the possibility of DVT with your surgeon. proactive.
  • If you are pregnant, wear compression stockings during your pregnancy and for 6 weeks postpartum.
  • Above all…wear compression stockings or compression socks to increase you circulation

Let’s all get out there and let our friends know about DVT,

Vanda

March is DVT Awareness Month – What is a DVT

March is DVT Awareness Month. This month I would like to address DVT (deep vein thrombosis) to inform you and your loved ones what a DVT is, risk factors of a DVT, and the symptoms of DVT.  I want you to become an activist and recognize when medical attention should be obtained. Roughly 600,000 people in the United States are affected by DVT each year. Not all of these are hospitalized. We all fear AIDS, breast cancer and traffic accidents, but what about DVT?  DVT kills more people every year than these maladies combined!

So what is a DVT and how is it formed? The arteries transport the oxygen rich blood away from the heart which is a one way pump. The veins are thin-walled blood vessels that carry oxygen poor blood from the tissues back to the heart. In order to move the blood against gravity the leg In order to move the blood against gravity the leg   In order to move the blood against gravity the leg Calf Contraction and Relaxation muscles squeeze the deep veins to move the blood back to the lungs and heart.muscles squeeze the deep veins to move the blood back to the lungs and heart. Wear support hose to prevent DVTmuscles squeeze the deep veins to move the blood back to the lungs and heart. The human body has three types of veins; superficial veins which are the veins that are close to the skin (the ones that you can see), deep veins which lie within the muscle structure within the body and perforating veins which connect the deep veins to the superficial veins. The veins contain one-way valves for the return of the blood back to the heart. When these valves do not close, stagnation of the blood can occur and a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can form most often near a venous valve. The DVT can permanently damage the vein wall and valve with scarring or fibrosis which can cause them to become incompetent resulting in reflux (backward) flow of blood and venous congestion. Compression socks and stockings work as a secondary pump and along with the calf muscles close the valves to move the blood back to the heart. Consult with your physician to determine if you have risk factors and seek advice on appropriate preventative measures, including the amount of compression to wear. We carry many compression socks and compression stockings which can help prevent DVT. Please check out our JobstMediSigvaris and Juzo support socks and support hose. Did you know all of the manufacturers offer a extensive line of garments which range from athletic socks, men’s dress and casual socks to women’s opaque and sheer thigh high stockings and pantyhose so that each of us can choose a style or styles that are targeted at our lifestyle?

Next week we look at Risk Factors for DVT…

Let’s all get out there and let our friends know about DVT,


Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

Santa Didn’t Wear His Support Socks

Hello To All,I Wish I Had Worn My Support Socks

Hope your Holiday season has been kinder to you than it was to our dear old friend Santa Clause. Santa forgot to wear his support socks for his whirl wind world trip and see how swollen his feet are!? If you have not been wearing your support socks or support stockings, your feet may look just like Santa’s and you may feel just as tired as Santa.

All kidding aside, when you take your get away this winter or spring be sure to wear your compression socks or compression stockings. The number of travel-related vein conditions is increasing each year. No matter how you travel, blood circulation in the lower extremity is reduced simply because you are sitting in one position. Symptoms such as heavy legs, leg pain, or swollen feet and ankles develop. The reduced circulation in the lower leg can lead to blood clots (DVT) or even worse the blood clots could break loose and travel to the lungs, resulting in a pulmonary embolism (PE) which can be deadly.

Blood clots are more common in the left leg, possibly because the femoral artery in that leg passes anterior to the vein, and may compress the vein. Symptoms do not usually develop immediately after travel, but more likely within three days of arrival at your destination. Symptoms may not manifest themselves for up to two weeks after a long trip. Symptoms include: pain in leg or pelvis, tenderness and swelling of the leg, discoloration of the leg (reddish), areas of the leg or pelvis region that feel warm to touch, or whole leg swelling.

DVT kills more people every year than AIDS, breast cancer, and traffic accidents combined. Don’t be like Santa, wear your support hose or support socks and arrive at your destination ready for a fun time!

Things You Can Do To Prevent DVT When You Travel

  • Wear comfortable, loose clothing
  • Get up and walk once every hour or two
  • Make figure eights and circles with your feet while seated
  • Breathe deeply frequently
  • Drink plenty of water (Avoid excessive alcohol intake – it dehydrates the body)
  • Elevate your feet when possible
  • Wear your support sock and stockings from Support Hose Plus

Just remember to wear support socks or support stockings when you travel and continue to wear them for the next few days after your arrival at your destination to make sure your legs return to normal size. Encourage friends or family who are traveling with you to do the same. (They may not know about the dangers of Travel Related DVT.) They may not have any problems, so a 15-20mmHg compression may be adequate for them.

Ho! Ho! Ho!
Happy Travels to You and Yours,

Vanda

Summer Travelers Be Alert and Prevent DVT

It is that time of the year again for summer vacations here in the northern hemisphere. Each year we send a reminder to our clients about how important it is to wear your compression socks or compression stockings especially when you travel. The number of travel-related vein conditions is increasing each year. No matter how you travel, blood circulation in the lower extremity is reduced simply because you sitting in one position. Symptoms such as heavy legs, leg pain or swollen feet and ankles develop. The reduced circulation in the lower leg can lead to blood clots or even worse the blood clots could break loose and travel to the lungs, resulting in pulmonary embolism which can be deadly.

Blood clots are more common in the left leg, possibly because the femoral artery in that leg passes anterior to the vein, and may compress the vein. Symptoms do not usually develop immediately after travel, but more likely within three days of arrival at your destination. Symptoms may not manifest themselves for up to two weeks after a long trip.

DVT kills more people every year than AIDS, breast cancer, and traffic accidents combined. You should become familiar with the symptoms of DVT so you may be your own activist.

Signs and Symptoms of DVT

  • Pain in the leg or pelvis regionPeople In Airplane
  • Tenderness and swelling of the leg
  • Discoloration of the leg (reddish)
  • Areas of the leg or pelvis region that feel warm to touch
  • Whole leg swelling

Symptoms of DVT can be similar to other conditions, like a pulled muscle or “Charlie horse” and can delay diagnosis. Some people may have no symptoms.

Signs and Symptoms of Pulmonary Embolism

  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Chest pain-sharp, stabbing: may get worse with deep breath
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Unexplained cough, sometimes with bloody mucus

If you suspect a pulmonary embolism, call 911 or go to the nearest ER. Having this knowledge could save your life!

Things You Can Do To Prevent DVT When You Travel

  • Wear comfortable, loose clothing
  • Get up and walk once every hour or two
  • Make figure eights and circles with your feet while seated
  • Breathe deeply frequently
  • Drink plenty of water (Avoid excessive alcohol intake – it dehydrates the body)
  • Elevate your feet when possible

Just remember to wear support socks or support stockings when you travel and continue to wear them for the next day after your arrival at your destination to make sure your legs return to normal size. Encourage friends or family who are traveling with you to do the same. (They may not know about the dangers of Travel Related DVT.) They may not have any problems, so a 15-20mmHg compression may be adequate for them. If they are looking for a low cost product, each of our major manufacturers makes a low cost garment that would be appropriate for travel… Jobst Relief, Mediven Active, Sigvaris Casual Cotton, Juzo Basic.  We also have economical products from  and Therafirm that may fit their budget better.

Wearing compression stockings during travel has been proven to reduce heavy feeling legs, swollen feet and ankles as well as the likelihood of developing DVT.

Note: If you have an existing venous conditions, currently having swelling or are at risk for DVT, see your doctor before long distance travel (more than four hours). He/she will prescribe a garment in the appropriate compression for you for travel or send you to a knowledgeable company such as Support Hose Plus who can assist you.

Monday the 72-year opera star, Placido Domingo, was admitted to a Madrid, Spain hospital with a pulmonary embolism caused by a Deep Vein Thrombosis. He has cancelled up to 5 appearances as his doctors have ordered him to rest for three to four weeks. Domingo is expected to make a full recovery. Contributing factors could have been the singer’s age as well as his heavy performance schedule that he maintains.

According to the National Blood Clot Alliance “350,000 – 600,000 in the United States develop blood clots every year. About 100,000 people in the U.S. die each year from blood clots…”. That means about 1 in 3.5 to 1 in 6 people in the U.S. who get blood clots die from them. I don’t know about you, but I don’t like those odds. I ‘ll be wearing my support stockings!

Happy and Safe Travels,

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

Chemotherapy and Deep Vein Thrombosis

In a newsletter last month I did not mention one of the conditions which can lead to Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)…I probably missed more than one. A wonderful customer reminded me and I thought it was important enough that we should revisit this.

Our customer wrote: In one of your recent blogs, you listed conditions that cause blood clots, but one cause was not on the list: chemotherapy.
During chemo, I developed classic signs of marked bilateral calf pain. The symptoms appeared neither suddenly nor gradually (I know, big help!). Thank goodness I didn’t let the pain go unaddressed, and when after my oncologist examined me, he asked if I wanted an ultrasound, I agreed. However I don’t think he believed anything was wrong.
During the ultrasound of my legs, even before I stepped down from the procedure table, not only had the techs told me I had blood clots, but they insisted I be wheel-chaired back to my doctor’s office in the same complex. I received immediate anticoagulation therapy.
By reporting this pain to my doctor, I saved my own life. Both the Coumadin and the compression stockings successfully cleared the clots; a repeat ultrasound last week showed no new clots, and the technician said “Your veins look beautiful!”
Who would have thought I would rejoice over my “beautiful veins”?
Thank you for fine service over the years. I encourage all women who are on their feet a lot to wear compression stockings, as I like to say they “hold up the world.” My leg pain–even clot free–is severe, and the stockings totally eliminate that pain.”

There are several reasons blood clots form in cancer patients who are on chemotherapy. I will try to address a few of them here.

Patients with cancer may have a higher number of platelets and clotting factors in their blood, possibly because cancer cells produce and release chemicals that stimulate the body to make more platelets. Platelets are very small, special blood cells that are involved in clot formation. They cluster together to form a plug to stop bleeding. They also produce other chemicals to help the blood clot and repair the leaking blood vessel.

Clotting factors are proteins made naturally by the body. They combine with platelets to help form blood clots and prevent bleeding. If you have more platelets and higher amounts of clotting factors than normal in your body, your blood is more likely to clot.

When chemotherapy kills cancer cells, the cells can release substances that cause an increase in blood clotting (coagulation). Specific types of chemotherapy drugs are more likely to cause a blood clot than others. A cancer patient’s doctor should explain to them if the drugs they are having increase their risk of getting a blood clot. Doctors are very clear that the benefits of the chemotherapy far outweigh the risks for developing a blood clot and patients should keep taking it. But patients should know the symptoms of a blood clot just in case.

Surgery and chemotherapy can both damage the walls of blood vessels. This will increase your risk of developing a blood clot.

The blood normally has proteins that are anticoagulants in it that help to thin the blood. If you have cancer you may have lower levels of these proteins.

Sometimes cancer or treatment can make a patient feel very ill and too tired and weak to move around as usual. Being inactive increases the risk of clotting because the normal movement of the leg muscles helps to pump the blood back up to the heart.

Just in case, cancer patients should be aware of the common symptoms of a blood clot:

  • Pain, redness and swelling around the area where the clot is
  • The area around the clot may feel warm to touchIf these occur, the cancer patient should not wait to see if it goes away. The symptoms should be reported to the physician or the physician’s nurse immediately.To help prevent clots:
  • Talk to your physician. (I have many oncologist around the country who want their cancer patients in some kind of compression.)
  • Take short walks as often as possible
  • If you can’t move around much, do simple leg exercises every hour, such as bending and straightening your toes and making figure 8’s.
  • Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated

With the advancement in medicine, cancer is being diagnosed earlier, and there are many cancer survivors. As some of you know my husband, Rod, is a cancer survivor. He wears his support socks every day and is doing quite well. We don’t want other cancer survivors to have to deal with DVT or worse. Advise you friend, family member, or loved one to talk to their oncologist about wearing support socks.

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

DVT and Pulmonary Embolism Associated with Factor V Leiden and Other Clotting Disorders

In our last newsletter we discussed the fact that the news anchor, David Bloom, had developed a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) which broke loose and became a Pulmonary Embolism which took his life. David had many risk factors such as prolonged immobility, dehydration as well as long-haul flights to Iraq which probably contributed to the development of David’s blood clot. David had a silent risk factor which he did not know about. He had Factor V Leiden – an inherited blood coagulant disorder that can increase a person’s risk of DVT. Factor V Leiden is the most common inherited clotting disorder in the United States.This disorder is present in 2% to 7% of Caucasians, less often in Hispanics and rarely in Asians and African-Americans. It accounts for 20% to 40% of cases of DVT.  Factor V Leiden is usually a hidden disorder, until someone in the family, someone who is athletic and healthy develops a DVT. Screening for Factor V Leiden is not usually done unless there are several members of the family who develop clots or one person develops several. Blood clots from Factor V Leiden can occur anywhere. The factor can increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, miscarriage, or gallbladder dysfunction.

There are other inherited conditions which can cause blood clot formation. These include:

  • Prothrombin gene mutation
  • Deficiencies of natural proteins that prevent clotting (such as antithrombin, protein C, and protein S)
  • Elevated levels of homocysteine
  • Elevated levels of fibrinogen or dysfunctional fibrinogen
  • Elevated levels of factor VIII (this is still being investigated as an inherited condition) and other factors including factor IX and XI
  • Abnormal fibrinolytic system

There are other conditions that increase a person’s risk of developing blood clots and do not necessarily indicate a genetic risk. However, you may want to have a serious discussion with your physician about testing for these factors if you have:

  • Several members of your family with blood clots
  • Abnormal blood clotting at a young age (less than 50 years old)
  • Blood clots in unusual locations or sites, such as veins in the arms, liver, intestines, kidney or brain
  • Idiopathic blood clots (no clear cause)
  • Blood clots that reoccur
  • History of frequent miscarriages
  • Stroke at a young age

Just as it is important for you to know your risk factors for DVT, it is important for you to be aware of blood clots in your family history and their cause and wear your support stockings or support socks.

This is the last in this series of March is DVT Awareness Month. We hope you have enjoyed it. If you have missed any, they are all here on our blog, Ask Vanda  just scroll down to view. We would love to have you leave a comment about a DVT you have experienced or about a risk you have from a factor deficiency.

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

DVT Awareness Continues

Nearly 10 years ago as a way of finding meaning to the death of her husband, David Bloom, Melanie set out to raise the public’s awareness about DVT. In 2003 David (age 39) was a NBC news anchor covering the war in Iraq and unknowingly developed a DVT which broke loose and became a Pulmonary Embolism that took his life. At the time he died only 26% of the population of the United States had even heard of a Pulmonary Embolism. Melanie, sponsored by Sanofi-Aventis (a drug company which makes a DVT Therapy), established March as National DVT Awareness Month and raised the awareness of DVT by 20% in 10 years. Wednesday morning Melanie and Dr.Geno Merli, a clinical professor at Jefferson University and co-director of the Jefferson Vascular Center, were on The Today Show to emphasize the personal risk factors and symptoms of DVT. Some of these risk factors include obesity, age, cancer, medications, injury, surgery, illness, pregnancy, smoking, heredity, and prolonged immobility. Warning signs of DVT include pain, swelling, tenderness, discoloration or redness in the affected area, and skin warm to touch. Symptoms of pulmonary embolisms include shortness of breath, an apprehensive feeling, chest pain, rapid pulse, sweating, or a bloody cough. It is important to know if you have personal risk factors of DVT because 50% of the time there are no symptoms. In the United States, DVT or pulmonary embolism affects 300,000 to 600,000 people a year and 60,000 to 100,000 die each year. Not all of the personal risk factors can be changed, but change the ones you can such as loose weight, quit smoking, become more physically active, and be aware that you are at risk of DVT and Pulmonary Embolism. Above all wear your compression stockings, or socks especially when you travel, have surgery, or become pregnant.

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

March is DVT Awareness Month 2013 – What You Can Do To Prevent DVT

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) is in the 3rd year of a program designed to raise awareness of DVT to women and their families. This year the CDC is focusing on the danger of DVT around trauma and surgery. The program targets women because they are at high risk and because they are very involved in decisions for the entire family. The program makes it clear that Deep Vein Thrombosis can be fatal and urges people who develop symptoms to seek help immediately.

If you anticipate a surgical procedure, you may want to ask if the hospital or physician offers preventive measures such as support stockings and anticoagulant therapy. Do they teach exercises or activities to reduce the risk of DVT? After surgery, as soon as your physician recommends increasing your mobility, do so to help prevent DVT.

According to a study from Oxford University patients recovering from surgery are at a high risk of DVT for much longer than previously thought. In this study it was found the likelihood of a patient to need hospital treatment for a DVT was 70 time higher than the norm. For those who had day surgery, the risk was 10 times higher than the norm. The danger was highest in the third week post-op, but continued for around 12 weeks.

DVT is not limited to women or men nor is age a limiting factor. A DVT can strike people from all walks of life with little warning. So keep your friends or loved ones health – tell them about DVT and how to prevent it by wearing compression hose and following a few tips…

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • If you smoke, quit.
  • Exercise your legs regularly when sitting or laying for long periods of time… This can be as simple as making figure 8’s with your feet or just walking for a few minutes
  • When sitting, stretch your legs and change position frequently.
  • Take a deep breath frequently.
  • Elevate your legs whenever possible.
  • Be careful about chairs and leg rests that compress the calf or behind the knee.
  • Avoid excessive alcohol intake (it dehydrates the body).
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Wear loose, non-binding clothes when traveling.
  • If you have family members with multiple DVT’s and they have been diagnosed as having a clotting disorder, consider being tested yourself.
  • If you are having surgery, discuss the possibility of DVT with you physician. Many physicians are happy that you are proactive.
  • If you are pregnant, wear compression stockings during your pregnancy and for 6 weeks postpartum.
  • Above all…wear compression stocking or support socks to increase your circulation.

If you have had a DVT and would like to share your experience, please scroll to the bottom and leave a comment as a guest.

Spread the word…Most DVT’s are preventable,

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

March is DVT Awareness Month 2013

I find it very interesting that we all fear diseases such as cancer, AIDS and even being in an auto accident, but few of us have a fear of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Pulmonary Embolism (PE). We really should. Blood clots from deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and Pulmonary Embolism (PE) cause more deaths than breast cancer, AIDS AND motor vehicle accidents combined. DVT’s are preventable.

There are certain people and certain times in our lives when we have increased risk of DVT. The most common risk factors include:

  • Prior family history of DVT’s
  • Diabetics
  • Cancer
  • Travel – especially long distances with little or no movement
  • Over 40 years of age
  • Over weight or obesity
  • Smoking
  • Surgery
  • Post-partum

Blood clots are usually formed in the deep veins of usually lower extremities (although it can occur anywhere in the body). When this happens, a piece of the clot can break loose and travel through the blood stream to the lung. This is a potentially life-threatening complication of DVT.

The symptoms of DVT may not be noticeable. There may be some pain in the muscle, some swelling, sudden onset of discoloration (bluish, purplish or reddish skin color) and that part of the body may feel warmer. This is not the time to wait. You should visit your primary care physician immediately.

Symptoms of PE can be dramatic. There may be shortness of breath, chest pain (which may become worse with a deep breath), unexplained cough (with or without blood) or unexplained rapid heart rate. This is the time you should go to the emergency room immediately!

More to come next week,

Vanda
http://www.supporthoseplus.com