Santa Didn’t Wear His Support Socks

Hello To All,I Wish I Had Worn My Support Socks

Hope your Holiday season has been kinder to you than it was to our dear old friend Santa Clause. Santa forgot to wear his support socks for his whirl wind world trip and see how swollen his feet are!? If you have not been wearing your support socks or support stockings, your feet may look just like Santa’s and you may feel just as tired as Santa.

All kidding aside, when you take your get away this winter or spring be sure to wear your compression socks or compression stockings. The number of travel-related vein conditions is increasing each year. No matter how you travel, blood circulation in the lower extremity is reduced simply because you are sitting in one position. Symptoms such as heavy legs, leg pain, or swollen feet and ankles develop. The reduced circulation in the lower leg can lead to blood clots (DVT) or even worse the blood clots could break loose and travel to the lungs, resulting in a pulmonary embolism (PE) which can be deadly.

Blood clots are more common in the left leg, possibly because the femoral artery in that leg passes anterior to the vein, and may compress the vein. Symptoms do not usually develop immediately after travel, but more likely within three days of arrival at your destination. Symptoms may not manifest themselves for up to two weeks after a long trip. Symptoms include: pain in leg or pelvis, tenderness and swelling of the leg, discoloration of the leg (reddish), areas of the leg or pelvis region that feel warm to touch, or whole leg swelling.

DVT kills more people every year than AIDS, breast cancer, and traffic accidents combined. Don’t be like Santa, wear your support hose or support socks and arrive at your destination ready for a fun time!

Things You Can Do To Prevent DVT When You Travel

  • Wear comfortable, loose clothing
  • Get up and walk once every hour or two
  • Make figure eights and circles with your feet while seated
  • Breathe deeply frequently
  • Drink plenty of water (Avoid excessive alcohol intake – it dehydrates the body)
  • Elevate your feet when possible
  • Wear your support sock and stockings from Support Hose Plus

Just remember to wear support socks or support stockings when you travel and continue to wear them for the next few days after your arrival at your destination to make sure your legs return to normal size. Encourage friends or family who are traveling with you to do the same. (They may not know about the dangers of Travel Related DVT.) They may not have any problems, so a 15-20mmHg compression may be adequate for them.

Ho! Ho! Ho!
Happy Travels to You and Yours,

Vanda

Summer Travelers Be Alert and Prevent DVT

It is that time of the year again for summer vacations here in the northern hemisphere. Each year we send a reminder to our clients about how important it is to wear your compression socks or compression stockings especially when you travel. The number of travel-related vein conditions is increasing each year. No matter how you travel, blood circulation in the lower extremity is reduced simply because you sitting in one position. Symptoms such as heavy legs, leg pain or swollen feet and ankles develop. The reduced circulation in the lower leg can lead to blood clots or even worse the blood clots could break loose and travel to the lungs, resulting in pulmonary embolism which can be deadly.

Blood clots are more common in the left leg, possibly because the femoral artery in that leg passes anterior to the vein, and may compress the vein. Symptoms do not usually develop immediately after travel, but more likely within three days of arrival at your destination. Symptoms may not manifest themselves for up to two weeks after a long trip.

DVT kills more people every year than AIDS, breast cancer, and traffic accidents combined. You should become familiar with the symptoms of DVT so you may be your own activist.

Signs and Symptoms of DVT

  • Pain in the leg or pelvis regionPeople In Airplane
  • Tenderness and swelling of the leg
  • Discoloration of the leg (reddish)
  • Areas of the leg or pelvis region that feel warm to touch
  • Whole leg swelling

Symptoms of DVT can be similar to other conditions, like a pulled muscle or “Charlie horse” and can delay diagnosis. Some people may have no symptoms.

Signs and Symptoms of Pulmonary Embolism

  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Chest pain-sharp, stabbing: may get worse with deep breath
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Unexplained cough, sometimes with bloody mucus

If you suspect a pulmonary embolism, call 911 or go to the nearest ER. Having this knowledge could save your life!

Things You Can Do To Prevent DVT When You Travel

  • Wear comfortable, loose clothing
  • Get up and walk once every hour or two
  • Make figure eights and circles with your feet while seated
  • Breathe deeply frequently
  • Drink plenty of water (Avoid excessive alcohol intake – it dehydrates the body)
  • Elevate your feet when possible

Just remember to wear support socks or support stockings when you travel and continue to wear them for the next day after your arrival at your destination to make sure your legs return to normal size. Encourage friends or family who are traveling with you to do the same. (They may not know about the dangers of Travel Related DVT.) They may not have any problems, so a 15-20mmHg compression may be adequate for them. If they are looking for a low cost product, each of our major manufacturers makes a low cost garment that would be appropriate for travel… Jobst Relief, Mediven Active, Sigvaris Casual Cotton, Juzo Basic.  We also have economical products from  and Therafirm that may fit their budget better.

Wearing compression stockings during travel has been proven to reduce heavy feeling legs, swollen feet and ankles as well as the likelihood of developing DVT.

Note: If you have an existing venous conditions, currently having swelling or are at risk for DVT, see your doctor before long distance travel (more than four hours). He/she will prescribe a garment in the appropriate compression for you for travel or send you to a knowledgeable company such as Support Hose Plus who can assist you.

Monday the 72-year opera star, Placido Domingo, was admitted to a Madrid, Spain hospital with a pulmonary embolism caused by a Deep Vein Thrombosis. He has cancelled up to 5 appearances as his doctors have ordered him to rest for three to four weeks. Domingo is expected to make a full recovery. Contributing factors could have been the singer’s age as well as his heavy performance schedule that he maintains.

According to the National Blood Clot Alliance “350,000 – 600,000 in the United States develop blood clots every year. About 100,000 people in the U.S. die each year from blood clots…”. That means about 1 in 3.5 to 1 in 6 people in the U.S. who get blood clots die from them. I don’t know about you, but I don’t like those odds. I ‘ll be wearing my support stockings!

Happy and Safe Travels,

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

What Compression Should I Choose?

Before we discuss what compression to choose, let’s look at how the compression helps control edema and makes our legs feel better. The muscles of the legs act a pump to assist the heart in the return blood flow from the extremities. When veins and valves of the legs become damaged or incompetent, compression stockings provide a little extra “squeeze” to help reduce the diameter of distended veins and help the valves to close. When this happens, the blood flow is increased. The “squeeze” is measured in mmHg compression.

If your physician has not suggested compression of support hose (compression stockings or support socks) to purchase, it can be very confusing. A garment with too little compression for your diagnosis may not contain the swelling. On the other hand, I have clients purchase 30-40mmHg compression because they want to be certain of getting rid of their swelling. Once they receive their purchase, they are even more frustrated because they are not able to don the garment. The correct compression, correct size, and style are some of the secrets to being a successful support hose (compression stocking or support sock) wearer.

For someone with little or no swelling, an 8-15mmHg compression may give the gentle message they desire.

For someone with mild swelling or to prevent varicose veins, a 15-20 compression may give them support they want.

For someone with moderate swelling, a 20-30mmHg compression may give them all the “squeeze” they need.

Here are some guide lines we follow when fitting a new client:

  • 8-15mmHg compression is generally used for
    • Minor ankle, leg and foot swelling
    • Those who want just a little gentle massage to help their tired, fatigued legs
    • A client who is very elderly and has serious heart problems or is not able to don a higher compression
  • 15-20mmHg compression is used for
    • Minor varicose veins
    • Travel (when there is no other leg problems)
    • Prevention of varicose veins during pregnancy
    • Post Sclerotherapy
  • 20-30mmHg compression is used for
    • Moderate to severe varicose veins
    • Moderate swelling (edema)
    • Post Sclerotherapy
    • Prevention of recurrence of venous ulcerations
    • Superficial Thrombophlebitis
    • Post surgical
    • Management of Neuropathy
    • Travel
    • Prophylaxis during pregnancy
    • Burn scar management
    • DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis) prevention
    • Healing of joint replacement
  • 30-40mmHg compression is used for
    • Severe varicose veins
    • Severe edema
    • Lymphedema
    • Management of active venous ulcerations
    • Prevention of recurrence of venous ulcerations
    • Prevention of Post-Thrombotic Syndrome
    • Management of PTS (Post-Thrombotic Syndrome)
    • Orthostatic Hypotension
    • Post Surgical
    • Post Sclerotherapy
    • Burn Scar Management.

For our returning clients, are you having problems such as your garment not containing your edema or your garment is rolling, pinching or otherwise not fitting properly? Call our Certified Fitters at 1-844-472-8807. Your problems could be due to wrong compression, wrong size, or wrong garment. For example a knee high 20-30mmHg from one manufacturer does not fit the same as the same garment from another manufacturer. Even different styles of garments from the same manufacturer (such as casual compared to dress) can fit different.

In conclusion a properly fitting compression garment of the proper compression and correct style can make your legs happy!
Our goal at SupportHosePlus.com has always been to help you improve the quality of your life!

Vanda

Opening Ceremonies for the 2012 Olympics

The Opening Ceremonies for the 2012 Summer Olympics in London are only 4 days away!

It was just last week I realized I have not encouraged you, my readers, if you are traveling to the Summer Olympics in London, to wear your support socks. As with any long distance travel, it is imperative that you wear compression socks or compression stockings. I cannot imagine any of our Olympic Coaches here in the US allowing their potential Olympic Champions to travel with out their support socks. Just think how terrible it would be after all their years of hard work, to be so close to their goal and develop a DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis, a blood clot in a deep vein of the leg) and not be able to compete for their Olympic Medal. Just think how terrible it would be for all of you who have planned the trip of your dreams to be unable to enjoy it because you develop a DVT. Wear your support stockings when you travel! (If you don’t normally wear support hose or support socks try the Jobst Travel Socks.)

Thanks for shopping at SupportHosePlus.com,
Vanda

Prevent Travel Related DVT

Prevent Travel Related DVT by Wearing Support Socks and Stockings

Summer time has arrived and many people are going on vacation. Some are traveling to England for the Summer Olympics. The occurrence of travel-related vein conditions is increasing. The lack of movement during travel can cause symptoms such as heavy legs, leg pain or swollen feet and ankles. During travel, blood circulation in the lower extremity is reduced. This leads to a major risk of developing phlebitis and blood clots or even worse the blood clots travel to the lungs, resulting in pulmonary embolism which can be deadly. Any type of travel which involves longs periods of sitting whether it is by car, bus, train or plane can put you at risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). This risk goes up the longer you sit. For example if your travel lasts for more than 5 hours, you are four times more likely to develop a DVT. Another interesting bit of information, both unusually tall, and short individuals, are particularly vulnerable to develop DVT. Most seats used for travel are designed for safety with fairly rigid metal frames. The metal bar at the front edge may compress the popliteal vein and result in venous stasis (decreased circulation) which can lead to DVT.

Symptoms of DVT do not usually develop immediately after travel, but more typically within three days of arrival. Symptoms may manifest themselves as long as 2 weeks after a long trip. Roughly about 600,000 people in the United States are affected by DVT each year. About 100,000 die as a result of DVT. DVT kills more people every year than AIDS, breast cancer and traffic accidents combined! You should know the symptoms of DVT so you may become your own activist and recognize when you should seek medical attention.
Be smart travel with Jobst Travel Socks

    Things You Can Do To Prevent DVT Are:

  • Wear comfortable, loose clothing
  • Get up and walk once every hour or two
  • Make figure eights and circles with your feet while seated
  • Breathe deeply frequently
  • Drink plenty of water (Avoid excessive alcohol intake – it dehydrates the body)
  • Elevate your feet when possible
    DVT Symptoms:

  • Pain in the leg or pelvis region
  • Tenderness and swelling of the leg
  • Discoloration of the leg (reddish)
  • Areas of the leg or pelvis region that feel warm to the touch
  • Whole leg may swell

Symptoms of DVT can be similar to other conditions, like a pulled muscle and can delay accurate diagnosis. Some people may have no symptoms. Wearing compression stockings during travel has been proven to reduce heavy feeling legs, swollen feet and ankles as well as the likelihood of developing DVT.

Note: If you have an existing venous conditions, currently having swelling or are at risk for DVT, see your doctor before long distance travel. He/she will prescribe a garment in the appropriate compression.

Just remember to wear support socks or support stockings when you travel and continue to wear them for the next day after your arrival at your destination to make sure your legs return to normal size. Encourage friends or family who are traveling with you to do the same. (They may not know about the dangers of Travel Related DVT.)
Happy and Safe Travels,
Vanda

Travelers’ Thrombosis

Each year during the summer travel months we try to send a reminder to our clients about how important it is to wear compression socks or stockings for your leg health especially when you travel.

Deep Vein Thrombosis which may occur shortly after a long trip has traditionally been called Economy Class Syndrome because of the relatively confined conditions associated with economy class travel. However, a thrombosis (blood clot) is not restricted to such and the alternative term of “Travelers’ Thrombosis” has been suggested. Travelers’ Thrombosis is not exclusively associated with air travel, in fact it has been associated with travel by car, bus or even train following trips as short as four hours.

Thrombosis is more common in the left leg, probably because the femoral artery in that leg passes anterior to the vein, and may compress it, resulting in a decreased blood flow (stasis), and possibly a blood clot. Symptoms do not usually develop immediately after travel, but more typically within three days of arrival. Symptoms may manifest themselves as long as 2 weeks after a long trip. Pulmonary embolism (a blood clot that breaks loose and travels to the lung) may be the first symptom, without any symptoms in the lower legs.

A study was conducted using 20 individuals…10 with risks for venous thrombosis and 10 without risks. They flew from Vienna to Washington and 2 days later returned to Vienna. Measurements of the legs were taken between the 5th and 8th hr of flight to Vienna, 1 day and 3 days after completion of their travel. The results showed no difference between the two groups, but there was a significant increase in the volume of the legs caused by edema (swelling of the legs) and they remained swollen 1 day after arrival in Vienna. This suggested that sitting in a cramped position, immobile with compression of  the popliteal vein (which carries the blood from the knee joint and muscles in the thigh and calf back to the heart) results in venous stasis and thus an increased risk of DVD because of Travelers’ Thrombosis.

For those people who have no problems with circulation in their legs, a 15-20 mmHg or “Travel Sock” is quite adequate. For those of us who are already predisposed to leg problems, a 20-30 mmHg or greater is a must!

Both unusually tall, and short individuals, are particularly vulnerable to Travelers’ Thrombosis. Most seats used for travel are designed for safety with fairly rigid metal frames. The metal bar at the front edge may compress the popliteal vein and result in venous stasis.


Just remember to wear your support socks or support stockings when you travel and continue to wear them for the next day after your arrival at your destination to make sure your legs return to normal size. As for me I will be wearing my Mediven Sheer and Soft or Mediven Comfort and Rod will probably be wearing the Sigvaris 230 Cotton. For us they are great choices because we are short. Many other folks prefer the Jobst ActiveWear, Sigvaris Recovery, or Juzo Silver Sole. Whatever your favorite compression sock or compression stocking, be sure you have it on!

Hope you enjoy your travels!

Vanda

 

JoViPak – One of Our New Manufacturers « Ask Vanda Weblog

At Support Hose Plus, we pride ourselves on keeping up with the latest technology in lymphedema and gradient compression stocking therapy for our clients.  We are excited to welcome our newest manufacturer, Jovipak to the Support Hose Plus family!  Jovipak® is a leader in the field of Lymphedema Products and now owned by Jobst.

You may have read many of our Articles on Lymphedema at my blog Ask Vanda. Lymphedema can develop when the lymphatic system is disturbed and can no longer rid your body sufficiently of lymph fluid.  Lymphatic vessels cover the human body like a net.  They collect and filter waste products such as protein, metabolic waste, and inflammatory products in the body fluids.

Today, let’s focus on the effects of air travel on those with lymphedema and those who might be susceptible to lymphedema.  Air travel, including in-flight, as well as all of the walking associated with airline travel, places those with lymphedema at risk, and can also cause the onset of lymphedema in those patients who may not yet know they are at risk.  Altitude and cabin pressure can wreak havoc on the human body.  Although aircraft cabins are pressurized, while traveling at altitude, that pressure is usually much less than that on the ground.  When traveling at, say, 18,000 feet, the atmosphere in the aircraft is like being on an 8,000-foot mountain peak, causing the pressure to feel as if you are 8,000 feet above sea level.  When pressure is decreased, the air expands and occupies a greater space.  Less oxygen is absorbed into the blood at these altitudes; therefore, less oxygen is circulated throughout the body during flight.  The trigger that causes or exacerbates lymphedema is the decrease in air pressure (the force exerted on the body by the weight of the air).  In addition to air pressure, just think of the effects of inactivity on flights.  It is a well-known fact that even people with an intact lymphatic system develop swollen ankles and feet during flights.  Obviously, then, think about the effects of inactivity in addition to compromised lymphatic drainage, in addition to cabin pressure on those who already suffer from lymphedema.  This can lead to very serious consequences.  Not to mention, ruin your trip.

Compression Therapy is the most effective means to counter the effects of venous insufficiency and lymphedema.  Compression Garments increase the tissue pressure, effectively reducing the accumulation of fluids in tissues and promotes lymphatic and venous return.  Always, always wear your compression garments!  Drink lots of water, as the humidity in an airplane cabin is usually less than 20% and can cause some dehydration, which increases swelling.  C

There are many garment choices for you and your therapist in lymphedema therapy.  You are already aware that we carry daytime-specific garments such as Jobst, Mediven, Juzo, and Sigvaris.  We also carry Solaris products, Farrow Wraps, Circ-Aid, and Barton Carey.

We now have Jovipak® which offers both day and night garments – everything from custom made garments, made to fit any part of your body affected by lymphedema, ready-made (ready to ship the same day of your order) garments for any body part, and solutions for chronic venous insufficiency.  These products are known for helping to keep your body parts dry and comfortable with Polartec® Power Dry® with wicking capabilities in a silky garment.  Some even have X-Static® (a silver fiber knit into the construction of the garment) for antimicrobial effects.  The continuous flow channeling in each garment directs lymph flow to functional alternate pathways as specified by your therapist.  Wearing a better night garment, in lieu of wrapping, can significantly reduce the size of your body part affected by lymphedema.  These garments are easy to don, and much less expensive than the cost of bandages.

There are 12 Polartec® colors to choose from!  Jovipak® is a great, patient-friendly alternative to bandaging.  And so much easier to put on!

Measuring is easy and can be done by you or by your therapist.  We can assist you in your measuring!

Ready-Made Garments:

image002 image004 image006 image008 image010

Call us at 1-844-472-8807.  We can help you determine which garment would work best for you.  Sizing is easy, and we will simply require 3 measurements from you for an arm.  Measure your wrist at the smallest point, your elbow, and the axilla (Place a piece of paper under your arm and fold around.  This is where the top of your garment should be placed).  Choose between Pink and Royal Blue, with or without a black or white outer jacket. For a knee high garment, ready-to-wear, simply measure the circumference of the smallest part of your ankle, usually just above the ankle bone, the largest part of your calf, and the knee at the tibial tuberosity.  Choose between Royal Blue and Leaf Green.  A matching JoVi Safety-Sok with non-slip sole is included with each knee high order. Call us with these measurements.

Made To Order:

image012 image014
The Made-To-Order garments are standard sized Ready-Made garments with modifications made expressly for you, and can even deal directly with leg lobules and problem areas on any body part.
Every client who has purchased a Jovipak® product has considerably been reduced within days of wearing the garments.  And comfort – this is one of the most comfortable garments on the market!

Custom Made-To Measure Garments:

image008 image010 image016 image017

Jovipak® has Made-To-Measure garments available to everyone’s unique measurement needs.  For children, men, or women, they will create a precision pattern to fit any body part.

You may receive assistance in ordering any of our wonderful products we carry by calling us at  1-844-472-8807.

We have certified fitters on staff to help you in determining what products would best suit your needs.  We can also assist you in placing your Jovipak® orders…even the custom orders.  Simply call 1-844-472-8807.  We look forward to hearing from you!  After all, We’re Here To Support You!