How To Put On Your Socks

I have customers call and tell me they would like a stocking with a zipper because they are not able to put on (don) their stockings or socks. You would think it would be a lot easier with a zipper, but it really is not. It takes 3-yes three hands to put on a zippered stocking. It takes two hands to hold the zipper together and one to zip the stocking. The zipper tends to slide down on the zippered stockings and the top of the zipper can dig into the leg causing a sore. Other customers express their desire to “step back” in compression (i.e. from a 20-30 to a 15-20 mmHg compression). This is not necessarily a good idea. You would not be following your physician’s orders and you would not be getting proper compression for your diagnosis. This should be a last-ditch choice when no other methods work.
First I suggest they follow the directions which we send with each and every order. If you have misplaced yours, here they are again:
Turn back the top of the stocking onto itself. Usually this is down to nearly the heel pocket.
Place your foot (toes pointed if possible) in the stocking until it meets resistance. With both hands grab the stocking on each side of your ankle and pull towards you body until it meets resistance.
donning3
Fold the stocking back onto itself, grab at the sides at the top of the fold and pull towards your body. Repeat the fold back and pulling procedure again until the garment is positioned correctly on your leg.
donning6
Smooth out any wrinkles and adjust the heel and ankle area for comfort.The top of knee-high stockings should be two finger widths below the crease at the back of your knee. Thigh high stockings should be two to four finger widths below you groin. With knee-high and thigh high garments, never pull on top band. This will break the threads on the band. Stockings will wrinkle and move throughout the day. Check your stockings periodically to smooth out any wrinkles. It is not unusual to need to adjust your compression socks or compression stockings at least three times a day. Don’t just pull on the top of the garment. Fold the stocking in half, place your thumbs inside the garment next to your leg and pull up. Repeat until the stocking is back in place.

 

SigvarisDonningGloves
If this method does not work, I recommend the Sigvaris Donning Gloves I call them my “Magic Green Gloves”. They give me greater strength in my fingers. The rough “nubbies” on the gloves enable you to “pinch and pull” your stockings up. You can also rub up and down your leg so the fullness of the garment is distributed even on the leg.
JobstAndMediDonners

 

Several of our manufacturers including Jobst and Medi make metal framed Donners which stretch the stocking open and enable you to “almost” just step into the stocking.

There are many other methods we use to enable you to get your support socks or support stockings on. Give us a chance to work with you and find a method which works for you so you can remain compliant with your doctor’s orders.

Remember, support socks or support stockings do you no good if they sit in your dresser drawer.

We hope we can make your life easier,

Vanda

We’re sorry…these donning devices will soon be on SupportHosePlus.com. Until they are, please call our toll-free number, 1-844-472-8807, to order.

Let’s Keep Your Legs Looking Great

EnlargedVeinAndDamagedVein

Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI) is one of the leading causes of swollen feet, ankles, and legs. There are several things that can cause CVI. In CVI the butterfly valves which help blood move from the lower extremity back to the heart are damaged (incompetent) and do not close properly. Ultimately long-term blood pressure in the leg veins that is higher than normal causes CVI. Prolonged sitting or standing can stretch the superficial vein walls and damage the valves. Compression stockings and compression socks help the veins to close by applying a specific amount of pressure to the leg (this is the compression which your physician recommends). The compression stockings and compression socks also work with the muscles of the lower extremity to act as a secondary heart pump to move the blood out of the lower extremity and back to the heart.

  • Ankle swelling
  • Tight feeling calves
  • Heavy, tired, restless or achy legs
  • Pain while walking or shortly after stopping

At the end of the day, someone with CVI may experience only slight swelling and their legs may be tired and heavy. Now is the time to visit your physician and get some compression socks or compression stockings to keep the CVI from becoming worse.

  • Family history of varicose veins
  • Being overweight
  • Not exercising enough
  • Being pregnant
  • Smoking
  • Sitting or standing for long periods of time

If you have a parent who has had varicose veins, if you are overweight, or if you sit or stand for long periods of time, again now is the time to visit your physician and get some compression socks or compression stockings to keep the CVI from becoming worse.

CVI can be diagnosed by your physician by reviewing your patient history and a physical exam. The physician may also measure the blood pressure in your legs and examine any varicose veins you may have. To confirm a diagnosis of CVI, the physician will usually order a duplex ultrasound or a venogram. A duplex ultrasound uses sound waves to measure the speed of blood flow and visualizes the structure of the leg veins. A venogram is an x-ray that uses a dye (contrast) which enables the physician to see the veins.

Chronic venous insufficiency is usually not considered a health risk; your physician will try to decrease your pain and disability. In mild cases of CVI, compression stockings or compression socks may alleviate the discomfort and swelling. Physicians usually use a 20-30mmHg compression stocking or a 20-30mmHg compression sock for this. The stockings will not make the varicosities go away, but is the least invasive treatment.

Chronic Venous Insufficiency

More serious cases of Chronic Venous Insufficiency require sclerotherapy, ablation, or surgical intervention such as stripping to correct the problematic vein. This is usually done by a vascular specialist or vascular surgeon. During sclerotherapy a chemical is injected in the affected vein or veins and a scar will form from the inside of the vein. During ablation a thin, flexible tube (catheter) with an electrode at the tip will heat the vein walls at the appropriate location to seal the vein. When a vein stripping is done one of the saphenous veins is removed. The physician will make a small incision in the groin area and usually another in the calf below the knee. The veins associated with the saphenous vein will be disconnected and tied off and the vein removed. There are other surgical procedures which are done to improve your leg health. After one of the above procedures 20-30mmHg compression stockings are usually put on and you are told to wear them for a certain length of time. Some physicians will tell their patients on their follow-up visit that it is no longer necessary to wear the compression garments. For me, this is where I have some concerns. If the real underlining cause of CVI (such as family history of varicose veins, being overweight, not exercising enough, smoking or sitting or standing for long periods of time) has not been corrected why would you not continue to wear compression stockings to keep from developing CVI again.

Compression stockings and socks have come a long way in the last few years. They no longer look like the garments our grandparents wore. They look like ordinary stockings and socks and can improve the quality of life. The stigma of wearing compression garments is in the past.

Let’s wear our compression stockings and socks to keep our legs looking great!

Vanda

http://www.supporthoseplus.com

More Answers To Your Questions

Many of our customers have submitted more questions they would like answered. I would like to share these questions with you as well as my answers.

I purchased my compression socks from a sports store. I have spider veins and am on my feet many hours. When I remove my socks I have indentions and red marks where my knee highs end. Are they too tight?
How to Measure

Without having all the facts, it is very difficult to say. The socks may not have a good release built in the top of the socks. They may be helping you and move your swelling up, but cannot move any further because the socks end. You may need a thigh high garment instead of a knee high. They may be an incorrect size. Why don’t you take your measurements 1st thing when you get up and call one of our Certified Fitters on our toll-free number, 1-844-472-8807, and let us assist in a garment that is appropriate for you?
Here is how to take your measurements:

Measurements should be taken upon arising when your legs are at their smallest.
  • Using a measuring tape measure around the smallest part of the ankle. This will be above the round bones (malleoli) on both sides of the ankle.
  • Next measure around the fullest part of your calf.
  • For thigh length styles also measure around the fullest part of the thigh.
  • *The measurement from the crease in the bend of the knee straight to the floor will also be needed.

For thigh high stockings you will need a length measurement from the glutial fold straight to the floor.

I was told by my OBGYN that thigh high stockings were not appropriate during pregnancy, because they could cut off the circulation in the groin area.

I do not feel properly fit thigh high stockings will cut off the circulation in the groin area. If you have a lot of swelling, they could move the swelling into to the vulva area. Maternity pantyhose are my garment of choice for pregnancy, because the tummy panel will give some support to the fetus and lift it off of the veins. Most maternity pantyhose have elastic in the waist band which can be adjusted or completely removed. That being said, I do have many customers who are pregnant wear thigh high stockings successfully.

I have a group of veins on one leg that always hurts, but especially when I go up and down stairs. What should I do?

Varicose veins usually do not hurt. If you are in that much pain, you should find a good vein specialist and have a complete evaluation. It may not be your varicose veins which are hurting. It could be something else and only a full evaluation can determine the true cause.

My doctor told me I have orthostatic hypotension and I should wear compression stockings. There is so many choices, what stocking should I choose.

As you know, when people have orthostatic hypotension and stand, their blood pressure drops and they may pass out. Compression stocking can help with this. The garment of choice is pantyhose, but many people are able to manage with a thigh high garment. A knee high garment is really not appropriate. The compression usually varies with the severity of orthostatic hypotension. At least at 20-30mmHg is used for this disorder, but sometimes a 30-40mmHg is required.

I have a DVT (deep vein thrombosis) should I wear my stockings 24/7 or just during the day?

You get the most benefit from your stockings when you are standing or sitting (vertical position). They are less helpful when you are sleeping (in a horizontal position). That being said, it depends on the severity of the DVT. It is very important for you start walking and getting exercise as soon as possible. If you are in doubt, consult your physician.

I have been diagnosed with lymphedema. I wear 20-30mmHg compression stockings, but I keep swelling more and more. Help! What should I do?

First you need to find a good lymphedema therapist. Your physician may give you a referral to a lymphedema therapist. The therapist will evaluate your swelling and probably wrap your extremity with layers of bandages to reduce your swelling as well as teach you some special massages you can do yourself later on. Once your swelling is reduced as much as possible, the therapist will recommend garments for you to wear each and every day. Remember you may need to go back into bandages occasionally  for a “tune up”. Lymphedema may not be currently curable, but is controllable if you follow your therapist instructions.

If you have more questions or comments, please scroll to the bottom of the blog entry to leave a comment or ask a question.

Thanks so much to those who submitted these questions,

Vanda


http://www.supporthoseplus.com

March Is DVT Awareness Month-Remain Vigilant for DVT

Last week I told you that DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis) can present itself with minimal symptoms. This week I would like to tell you a story that really happened and how easily it is to convince yourself that a DVT is simply something that will go away.

This story is about a female. She is in her 40’s, apparently healthy with no chronic health conditions, and very active. She got up one morning and went to make coffee. All of a sudden she felt as though she had been hit by a truck. She felt light headed and had waves of nausea. She thought she had food poisoning or sudden onset of flu. Her right calf was painful and swollen.

By afternoon she was obviously limping, overwhelmingly fatigued, and sweating (she thought she possibly had a fever from the flu). She passed out on the couch telling her son she just need to rest and would go the doctor the next day if she was not better. Then she passed out in the bathroom, but was sure it was a really bad flu bug. By the end of the day she was able to eat a bowl of soup and keep it down. She was certain she was now on the mend.

The next morning she was still tired; she thought it was just post flu. Her real problem was now her calf. It was now warm, swollen, and painful. She thought she had pulled a muscle while walking the dog. The pain in her calf kept her up that night.

On the third morning, when she flexed her foot it caused pain. She got on WebMD and self-diagnosed herself as having an inflammation of the calf muscle. She decided to go to the urgent care center and told her husband to go on and do what he needed to do. After accessing her health status, the physician at the urgent care center did an ultrasound to rule out a blood clot. To his (and her) surprise there was a blood clot in the calf.

DVT formation SupportHosePlus.com

Now she remembered pulling that calf muscle about 6 months earlier, but assumed it was from turning or twisting on ice while running or walking the dog. The “pulled muscle” had seemed to resolve in a couple of weeks. The physician thought that was probably when the blood clot formed and labeled the blood clot as idiopathic because her only risk factor was a longstanding prescription for low-dose birth control pills. Because she was stable, she was sent home on Coumadin and Heparin.

The internist she saw a few days later thought the “flu like symptoms” she experienced were warning signs of a pulmonary embolism (PE). She had probably thrown a clot from the calf when she got up that first morning.

She will now be wearing her support stockings for at least one year, remain super-vigilant for DVT, and will never allow any type of hormone therapy. All of our support stockings and support socks are specially priced off of the manufacturers suggest retail price.
This lady was very fortunate. She had passed out twice oblivious of what was going on. She could have easily died from the PE. Know the symptoms of DVT and PE.

Signs and Symptoms of DVT

  • Pain in the leg or pelvis region
  • Tenderness and swelling of the leg
  • Discoloration of the leg (reddish)
  • Areas of the leg or pelvis region that feel warm to touch
  • Whole leg swelling

Signs and Symptoms of Pulmonary Embolism

  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Chest pain-sharp, stabbing: may get worse with deep breath
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Unexplained cough, sometimes with bloody mucus

Similar scenarios have happened to athletes when they have experienced injuries. It could happen to anyone! If you suspect a DVT see your physician. If you suspect a PE get medical attention immediately!

Vanda

March is DVT Awareness Month – What is a DVT

March is DVT Awareness Month. This month I would like to address DVT (deep vein thrombosis) to inform you and your loved ones what a DVT is, risk factors of a DVT, and the symptoms of DVT.  I want you to become an activist and recognize when medical attention should be obtained. Roughly 600,000 people in the United States are affected by DVT each year. Not all of these are hospitalized. We all fear AIDS, breast cancer and traffic accidents, but what about DVT?  DVT kills more people every year than these maladies combined!

So what is a DVT and how is it formed? The arteries transport the oxygen rich blood away from the heart which is a one way pump. The veins are thin-walled blood vessels that carry oxygen poor blood from the tissues back to the heart. In order to move the blood against gravity the leg In order to move the blood against gravity the leg   In order to move the blood against gravity the leg Calf Contraction and Relaxation muscles squeeze the deep veins to move the blood back to the lungs and heart.muscles squeeze the deep veins to move the blood back to the lungs and heart. Wear support hose to prevent DVTmuscles squeeze the deep veins to move the blood back to the lungs and heart. The human body has three types of veins; superficial veins which are the veins that are close to the skin (the ones that you can see), deep veins which lie within the muscle structure within the body and perforating veins which connect the deep veins to the superficial veins. The veins contain one-way valves for the return of the blood back to the heart. When these valves do not close, stagnation of the blood can occur and a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can form most often near a venous valve. The DVT can permanently damage the vein wall and valve with scarring or fibrosis which can cause them to become incompetent resulting in reflux (backward) flow of blood and venous congestion. Compression socks and stockings work as a secondary pump and along with the calf muscles close the valves to move the blood back to the heart. Consult with your physician to determine if you have risk factors and seek advice on appropriate preventative measures, including the amount of compression to wear. We carry many compression socks and compression stockings which can help prevent DVT. Please check out our JobstMediSigvaris and Juzo support socks and support hose. Did you know all of the manufacturers offer a extensive line of garments which range from athletic socks, men’s dress and casual socks to women’s opaque and sheer thigh high stockings and pantyhose so that each of us can choose a style or styles that are targeted at our lifestyle?

Next week we look at Risk Factors for DVT…

Let’s all get out there and let our friends know about DVT,


Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

Chocolate and Support Hose

Since we have been talking about February is Heart Health month; I decided to do some searching for things which will help our cardiovascular system. Much to my surprise I found chocolate contains an antioxidant called polyphenols. Polyphenols are phytochemicals that give plants their distinctive colors and provide protection from UV damage, pests and infections. They can be found in blueberries, green tea, and red wine as well as cacao. Foods that contain polyphenols act as antioxidants; protecting proteins, fats and DNA from oxidative damage (this plays a roll in development of aging and degenerative disease, including cardiovascular disease). It has been shown that cacao consumption increased HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) and appears to protect LDL for oxidation which may cause atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Polyphenols also seem to protect endothelial function. The endothelium is a thin layer of cells that line the inside of all blood vessels and moderate inflammation. Thus polyphenols promote vascular health.

    Cacao has been found to

  • Modestly improve blood pressure
  • Improve the production of nitric oxide in the body (improves blood flow) and enhance the immune system, and the brain
  • Modulate inflammation in the whole body and yield a lower C-reactive protein level
  • May enhance blood flow to the brain (which may improve memory and protect neurons from damage)
    It is the polyphenols that attract all the attention; however cacao is high in other nutrients

  • Magnesium supports a healthy heart rhythm and blood pressure and supports strong bones
  • Copper is involved in the production of potent internally produced antioxidants

It may not be chocolate’s high polyphenol content, but all these compounds working together that produce chocolate’s health benefits. In a study of women who consumed 41 grams of dark chocolate a day for six weeks, none gained weight. Now 41 grams of dark chocolate might be over-kill. 41 grams is the size of a Hershey’s’ dark chocolate bar. It is estimated that 6.7 grams (0.23 ounces) is the ideal amount (that is about the size of 1 1/2 Hershey’s Kisses).

Cacao NibsWe chocolate lovers are very lucky; there is a lot of research taking place regarding our beloved food. We must be very careful, we are not talking about your run of the mill processed milk chocolate with added milk and sugar which many times contain little or no cacao. All the health benefits of the chocolate get smaller as the percentage of cacao diminishes. To reap the benefits of this delicious, gourmet food, choose dark chocolate with a high percentage of cocoa (cacao)…70% or higher. I know some of us chocolate lovers cannot see ourselves eating a few squares of dark chocolate each day. There are other ways to get your health fix of cocoa (cacao) daily. Try unsweetened cocoa powder or raw cacao powder in a smoothie or protein shake, or add cacao nibs to healthy trail mixes. If you are at home in the kitchen you might even want to try a Mexican mole negro or add unsweetened cocoa powder to red chili. Let your imagination run wild!
When we apply a support stocking or support sock to our legs we are helping the damaged valves and incompetent veins in our legs to function more normally

When we apply a support stocking or support sock to our legs we are helping the damaged valves and incompetent veins in our legs to function more normally and increase the blood circulation. Why not work from the inside also by imbibing in a little dark chocolate to protect endothelial function (the lining of our veins), increase circulation, support a healthy heart rhythm, blood pressure, strong bones, and produce antioxidants.

Here’s to a healthy body with dark chocolate and support socks,

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

February is American Heart Heath Month

 

February is American Heart Month. The heart is part of the circulatory system which also includes veins, arteries. The heart is a little powerhouse, about the size of a closed fist and weighs only about 10.5 ounces, yet it is the strongest muscle in the body. It powers the circulatory system by moving 5000 to 6000 quarts of blood through the body each day. It transports oxygen, nutrients, hormones, and cellular waste products throughout the body. At rest the heart easily pumps over 5 liters of blood throughout the body every minute (that is approximately the total volume of blood in the body).

Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen rich blood away from the heart. The arteries are in such close proximity to the heart that they do not need valves to keep the blood from back flowing. The veins are blood vessels that carry the oxygen depleted blood back to the heart. Because the arteries use most of the energy from the heart’s contractions, the veins have lower pressure and the walls are thinner, and relay on gravity and movements or contractions of skeletal muscles to push the blood back to the heart. Some veins have valves which keep the blood from “back flowing”. When these valves become damaged, swelling will occur usually in a lower extremity. Apply a compression stocking or compression sock will help the damaged valve to close enabling the blood to continue the journey back to the heart. This takes some of the load off the heart and helps your heart stay healthy. Who would have thought a compression sock or stocking would help your heart stay healthy!

To keep my heart healthy I love to take walks and Sigvaris Sock and Sleeves or any of the Jobst Socks and Stockings (15-20mmHg or greater) will help increase my circulation and help keep my heart healthy. (You do not have to be an athlete to love some of these socks.)

Here’s to a heart healthy journey for all of us,

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

More Questions You Have Asked

Our clients have certainly given us some questions that need to be addressed. One of the main concerns seems to be that of being able to don and doff (put on and take off) their own compression stockings. Staying independent is important to all of us. One question that was asked is if there is a donner for support pantyhose similar to the one for knee high or thigh high support socks. Yes there is. However I do not recommend using it. I believe it is one thing to have one leg in a donner trying to pull up a support sock, but to have both legs involved in a donner I feel could lead to a nasty fall.

It seems everyone wants to know the easiest way to put on support pantyhose. I would like to share with you how I put my panty hose on. I wear 20-30 pantyhose and it takes me about 5 minutes and a bit of patience to put my stockings on in the morning. While it is not an easy task, it is really no more difficult than putting on a pair of knee high stockings. The hardest part of putting on any lower extremity compression garment is getting it over the heel. First I will repeat what I said last week, never gather the stocking. I use the Sigvaris Donning Gloves to put on my support pantyhose. I call them my “magic green gloves”. They enable arthritic hands to have better grasp. I use the little “nubbies” to pinch and pull the stockings up. They also protect my stockings from my fingernails. Even when I have the Sigvaris Donning Gloves on, I use only the balls of the finger tips to grasp the stockings.

First I sit down and with out my “magic green gloves” I pull the stockings on one leg as far as I can.  (For me, it is easier to start with the left leg.) Then I put on my gloves and pull the stocking up and over my heel and then up my leg as high above the knee as I can by pinching the garment and pulling it up. Then I start the other leg into the stocking and use the gloves in the same manner to pull the stocking up to the same level.

When I have them as high up my legs as I can get them while sitting down I remove the gloves, stand up, and pull the stockings up and over my tummy. Once this is accomplished, I put the gloves back on and start at the ankle of each leg and re-stretch the stockings by pinching and pulling all the way up the leg.

Then I take the gloves off and place my hands in the back of the stockings with my palms out. I push away from the body and lift up without grabbing the stockings. This seats the crotch of the pantyhose.

If the color or appearance of the stockings is uneven, I put on the gloves and use the flat of the hand to rub gently up or down the leg to adjust the stocking so it has an even appearance.

peel a banana3

Now that we have managed to put on stockings or socks, how are we going to get them off? I have had clients become so frustrated and panicked that they cut (yes, cut) a very expensive garment off. Same thing applies here as when putting on a compression garment…never gather the garment (or allow it to roll) when removing it. It becomes like the rubber band again and extremely difficult to remove. Instead start at the top and pull the garment down allowing the garment (it does not matter if it is a knee high, thigh high, or pantyhose) to slid on itself until you are able to pull it off your foot. The stocking slides on itself.  Peel your socks off just like you peel a banana.

If the “Peel a banana” method is not working for you, we have another option the Mediven Butler Off. The Butler Off looks similar to a shoe horn. There is a handle on top for pushing and a “tooth” to help push the garment off. The Butler Off is not meant for use with sheer support hose, but with more substantial garments. The Butler Off is not to be used to help push yourself up from a sitting position.

How to Use the Medi Butler Off for Removal of Stockings or SocksHow to use Medi Butler Off

  • Slide the tip of the horn under the top band of the stockings.
  • Now push the handle gently downwards: the far end of the horn slides down your calf and then over your heel. During the whole process the inner surface of the horn should remain in contact with your skin. At the same time the “tooth” helps push the stocking downwards. In order to regain contact with your skin you can start again with the horn a little higher and then continue with the downward movement if necessary.
  • As soon as you reach your heel lift your heel up. Then tilt the stick downwards a little to guide the horn along the underside of your foot. Caution: Make sure you do not press the stocking against the ground with the doffing aid. Otherwise the stocking may be damaged. Now push the handle forwards gently: the stockings slides off your foot, but stays on the horn.

There are more ways to don and doff compression stockings or support socks that these, but perhaps this will get you started. If you have comments or more questions, please click on the title of this newsletter, More Questions You Have Asked, scroll to the bottom of the blog, and leave your message as a guest.

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

 

Support Hose – Questions You May Have Asked

I had a gentleman email me the other day asking how to sort his compression socks into pairs. This started me thinking…there are questions we get asked over and over again so I thought I would devote a few newsletters covering some of these questions.

How can I sort support socks so I don’t embarass myself by having on mismatched support socks?

mismatched socks

    Compression socks are dyed so very heavy that it is often very difficult to tell the difference between blue, brown and black until you have mismatched socks on! (Even in this photo one sock is brown and the other back.)
  • You should get your socks in really good light. They are much easier to pair that way.
  • You could put each pair in a separate lingerie bag when you remove the socks. They are always paired that way.
  • When you receive your new socks, take a few running stitches in the top of the socks. Use a different color for each pair.

Is there any way to make support socks or support stockings with silicone tops stay up?  
wiping silicone band with alcohol small

    After you have had your socks or stockings with a silicone band for a little while (less than the 4 – 6 month life of the garment), they may start to slide down.

  • Sometimes you will get a body protein and lotion (accidental application) build up on the silicone band (even if you wash these garments every night).
  • Take a wash cloth dampened with rubbing alcohol and wipe only the silicone dots or silicone strips. This could be done weekly as a deterrent to garments sliding
  • This will restore the tackiness of the silicone.

 

Is there an easier way to put support hose or support socks on someone else?

Donning a Sock

    I have clients who are caregivers make comments about how hard it is to put compression support hose or support stockings on someone else.

  • To begin with, never and I mean never, gather the compression sock or stocking like you would an ordinary sock or stocking. The garment becomes like a rubber band and you cannot stretch it open far enough to insert the toes… no matter how strong you are, it is next to impossible. Fold the top of the sock down until you are right above the heal pocket.
  • Insert your thumbs into the opening and stretch the garment open. (You are only stretching two layers of support sock and not a clump of support sock).
  • Next sit next to the person you are going to put the stockings on and pull the garment on them as though you were pulling the garment onto your leg.
  • It is many times easier to pull a sock or stocking on than try to push one on!

If you have questions or comments, scroll to the bottom of this blog and leave your comment or question as a guest.