September Is Healthy Aging Month 2015

happy-couple-jumping-high-2 6 x1 7The baby boomers use to be referred to as our aging population. The generation x-ers are quickly entering this category. There are 76 million baby boomers over the age of 50. In 2015 the first of 82.1 million generation x-ers will reach that milestone. If you have been a bit lazy this summer, September is a great month to get your goals back on track. No matter your age, it is never too late to get your health goals back in order. Why not use September as motivation to look at where you are and what you want to become in 10, 20, or 30 years.  You can make small improvements to your mental, physical, and emotional habits that will improve every aspect of your life.

Here are a few tips I have found on the internet to help you achieve that goal:

  • Don’t act your age. Think about what was your best year and become that you.
  • Walk like an energetic person. Do you walk slowly because you have become lazy or have a fear of falling? Make a conscious effort to take longer strides, walk with heel first.
  • Stand up straight. You take years off your self by holding your stomach in, shoulders back and chin up. Practice this daily until it becomes natural.
  • Smile more. It is hard to be grumpy if you are smiling!
  • Put those compression socks and compression stocking back on that you have not been wearing this summer and start walking. Do this for your health as well as to meet and see people.
  • Find your inner artist. Learn something you have always wanted to. Take music lessons, painting lessons or just redesign your flower beds. Set goals.

Part of improving your health is your diet. Many people have adopted the Mediterranean Life Style. This incorporates healthy food as well as daily exercise. It may take some time to shift the way you eat, but eating lots of fruit and vegetables, beans and nuts, whole grains, fish and olive oil, small amounts of meat, dairy and red wine can increase your heart health and lower your blood pressure and cholesterol. Fresh fruits and vegetables contain fiber as well as vitamins and minerals your body needs to fight chronic diseases such as stroke, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. The human body is 50 to 65% water. It only stands to reason that our go to drink should be water to keep us hydrated.

Sigvaris striped 3x3Fall is in the air and to help you begin you journey to healthy aging, Support Hose Plus is offering wonderful Sigvaris products. Be sure to check out the “Cool Nights with Cool Colors”… the Sigvaris Soft Opaque is now available in Midnight Blue and Sigvaris Midtown Microfiber is available in Steel Gray! Check the bold new look of Midtown Microfiber in Dark Navy Stripe in 15-20 and 20-30 compression and coming soon for women Midtown Microfiber Pink Stripe! Check out the special pricing for a limited time on all Sigvaris Products. active-seniors 3x3

Healthy aging is more than just staying physically healthy – it is about maintaining you sense of purpose and zest for life. So “Dance like there’s no tomorrow“.  Just as getting better oxygen flow to the lower extremities by wearing support stockings improves your leg health; exercise increases the oxygen to the brain.

Here’s to Healthy Aging,

Vanda Lancour

What is mmHg?

Many of you have asked what is mmHg or mm Hg (it is written both ways) when we talk about compression hose. “mmHg” stands for millimeters of Mercury. This measurement is the same measurement used to measure your blood pressure as well as the atmospheric pressure. It is the force per unit area exerted by an atmospheric column (that is, the entire body of air above the specified area). When you have a blood pressure reading, such as “120/80 mmHg,” we say it is “120 over 80 millimeters of mercury.” The top number, the systolic reading, measures arterial pressure during the heart’s contraction. The bottom diastolic number assesses arterial pressure when the heart is relaxing between beats, refilling itself with blood. When we talk about compression in garments, is usually expressed as a range, i.e. 20-30 mmHg. That is the range of pressure the garment is capable of exerting at the ankle dependent upon the measurements the fitter takes. Since the compression garments are gradient or graduated, the pressure gets less as it goes up the leg and less as it goes toward the toe.

Compression garments were developed when a person with lower extremity venous insufficiency (a condition  that occurs when the veins in the legs are not working effectively to pump blood from the legs back to the heart) realized that when they went into a body of water such as a swimming pool the increased pressure in the pool relieved the pain and discomfort from the venous condition. The deeper they progressed in the pool, the more relief they felt. From this discovery a very rudimentary wrap developed which reduced the swelling or edema and improved their quality of life.

Through the years, this rudimentary wrap has evolved into the wonderful compression garments we have today. They are available in many different compressions to accommodate the severity of disease. Compression classes
Support hose or support socks fit every lifestyle…from the sheerest, most fashionable stockings, or men’s dress socks to many types of athletic socks for both men and women. The stockings and socks are made of a wide variety of yarns which include nylon, wool, cotton, polyester, acrylic, and Lycra Spandex or Elasthan (Lacra Spandex or Elasthan is the yarn which give the garment its “stretchability”). All are knit in a manner to move the perspiration next to the skin to the outside of the garment so it can evaporate to keep you more comfortable. Many of our clients have several different styles of stockings and socks to fit their myriad lifestyles.

The stockings you wear with compression (mmHg) are not the old “supp hose” your grandmother use to wear. Call one of our Certified Fitters on our toll-free line, 1-844-472-8807, for assistance with the selection of new garments or go to  www.supporthoseplus.com

Here is to healthy legs,

Vanda Lancour

Signs of Orthostatic Hypotension

Do you remember when you were younger and had a lot more energy? Sometimes you would get up too fast and get dizzy. This is called orthostatic hypotension or postural hypotension.  You may feel dizzy, lightheaded, or even faint. You may not have to get up fast any more to experience the dizzy feeling. This episode may last a few seconds to a few minutes after standing. If it lasts longer than that, you need to visit with your physician to make sure there is nothing else to be concerned about. Orthostatic hypotension can occur in anyone, but can be seen particularly in the elderly and those with low blood pressure.

Some of the signs and symptoms of orthostatic hypotension after sudden standing are:

  • Dizziness
  • Intense feelings of well being or disorientation
  • Lightheaded
  • Nausea
  • Distortions in hearing
  • Blurred or dimmed vision
  • Fainting

Orthostatic hypotension is caused primarily by pooling of blood in the lower extremity caused by gravity. This can set off a chain reaction:

  • Venous return to the heart is compromised
  • Decreased cardiac output
  • Lowered arterial pressure
  • Lowered systolic and diastolic pressure
  • Insufficient blood flow to the upper extremity

Normally the blood pressure does not fall very much when you stand, because it automatically triggers vasoconstriction (narrowing of blood vessels caused by muscular contraction of the muscle in the vein wall). Orthostatic hypotension may be aggravated when there is a lower volume of blood present (bleeding, diuretics, dehydration vasodilators or other types of drugs, or prolonged bed rest). There are also certain diseases which could aggravate orthostatic hypotension, but those are best diagnosed and addressed by a physician.

BPStanding BPSitting

One simple test for orthostatic hypotension is taking the blood pressure while sitting or lying down and again when standing.

A drop in systolic blood pressure of 20 mmHg and/or a drop of diastolic blood pressure of 10 mmHg could be diagnostic. A tilt table test or other tests may also be used.

lwa-ask-your-physician

The treatment of orthostatic hypotension will depend on the cause, but physicians will usually review the medications you are currently taking to
make sure there is nothing that could cause your symptoms. Your physician may recommend lifestyle changes such as increase in fluid intake, standing slowly, and avoid bending at the waist. Sometimes wearing compression stockings will help control the drop in blood pressure you have experienced. Some physicians will recommend a 15-20 mmHg knee high: other physicians recommend a 20-30 mmHg knee high. A knee high garment may be adequate to control a mild drop in blood pressure, but in severe cases, a 30-40 mmHg waist high garment may be required. In any case, if you are having symptoms of orthostatic hypotension, consult with your physician.

SupportHosePlus.com offers many styles of garments your physician may recommend. Remember there is a wide range of athletic, dress, casual, and sheer stockings to fit your lifestyle. Check your latest e-mail for specials and call one of the Certified Fitters at SupportHosePlus.com. Toll-free 1-844-472-8807

If you have orthostatic hypotension please share with us how you and your physicians have been able to manage it, go to the bottom of the blog entry and leave a comment.

Vanda

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Through the Ages

I have addressed Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), its causes, how it can be recognized, and treatments many times. I thought we might review the history of treatment of DVT.

The first documented case of DVT occurred more than 700 years ago in the middle ages. A 20 year old Norman cobbler, Raoul, developed unilateral edema in the ankle and calf which the moved up to the thigh. His physician advised him to “wait and see”. Raoul’s symptoms worsened and he developed a leg ulcer. He visited St Eloi’s shrine, without any improvement. Then he visited the tomb of King Saint Louis. He spent some time in prayer to no avail. He then decided to collect the dust he found below the stone that covered tomb. He applied the dust direct to the ulcer. The story reports he was miraculously healed and was still alive 11 years later. After this story of Raoul, there was increased mention of DVT especially in pregnant and postpartum women.

During the Renaissance physicians thought that pregnancy-related DVT (leading or only cause of DVT) was the result of “evil humors”. It was thought that postpartum DVT was caused by retention of unconsumed milk in the legs (‘milk leg’). Therefore in the late 1700’s breast-feeding was encouraged to prevent DVT.

From 1784 – 1920’s treatment was evidence based. In 1676 Wiseman suggested DVT was a consequence of alteration of blood. In 1793 Hunter hypothesized it was a occlusion of a vein by blood clots. In 1784 Hunter performed ligations (ties) above the blood clot to prevent extension of the clot. Because there was no other treatment for Pulmonary Embolism (PE) this became widely used at the end of the 19th century. This could be done at the femoral, common femoral, iliac or inferior vena cava. Used until mid 20th century along with anticoagulants after they became available.

Iron Splints

Since there was great fear of the blood clot migrating and becoming a PE, strict bed rest was prescribed and was the
cornerstone of DVT treatment from the end of the 19th century. Patient’s limbs were set in iron splints to prevent movement and special inclining beds were used to increase venous return.

Inclining Bed

During the 19th century it was thought that DVT was caused by inflammation of the vein wall, fever, postpartum and after septic surgical procedure. Treatment included anti-inflammatory medication and treatment for infection. Blood letting was popular (especially with leeches) as well as cupping, purging, applying ice or prescribed cold bath. These treatments started becoming obsolete in early 1900’s. Prior to 1930’s (before anticoagulant therapy) treatment was bed rest to fix thrombus, elevation and now application of heat with warm compresses to increase collateral circulation and reduce venous spasm. In hospitals Wright describes the preventative measures such as early ambulation, elastic compression, avoidance of dehydration and tightly applied adhesive strapping.

Next week we will continue with the last 100 years. In the meantime, keep wearing your support stockings and support socks!

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

Let’s Keep Your Legs Looking Great

EnlargedVeinAndDamagedVein

Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI) is one of the leading causes of swollen feet, ankles, and legs. There are several things that can cause CVI. In CVI the butterfly valves which help blood move from the lower extremity back to the heart are damaged (incompetent) and do not close properly. Ultimately long-term blood pressure in the leg veins that is higher than normal causes CVI. Prolonged sitting or standing can stretch the superficial vein walls and damage the valves. Compression stockings and compression socks help the veins to close by applying a specific amount of pressure to the leg (this is the compression which your physician recommends). The compression stockings and compression socks also work with the muscles of the lower extremity to act as a secondary heart pump to move the blood out of the lower extremity and back to the heart.

  • Ankle swelling
  • Tight feeling calves
  • Heavy, tired, restless or achy legs
  • Pain while walking or shortly after stopping

At the end of the day, someone with CVI may experience only slight swelling and their legs may be tired and heavy. Now is the time to visit your physician and get some compression socks or compression stockings to keep the CVI from becoming worse.

  • Family history of varicose veins
  • Being overweight
  • Not exercising enough
  • Being pregnant
  • Smoking
  • Sitting or standing for long periods of time

If you have a parent who has had varicose veins, if you are overweight, or if you sit or stand for long periods of time, again now is the time to visit your physician and get some compression socks or compression stockings to keep the CVI from becoming worse.

CVI can be diagnosed by your physician by reviewing your patient history and a physical exam. The physician may also measure the blood pressure in your legs and examine any varicose veins you may have. To confirm a diagnosis of CVI, the physician will usually order a duplex ultrasound or a venogram. A duplex ultrasound uses sound waves to measure the speed of blood flow and visualizes the structure of the leg veins. A venogram is an x-ray that uses a dye (contrast) which enables the physician to see the veins.

Chronic venous insufficiency is usually not considered a health risk; your physician will try to decrease your pain and disability. In mild cases of CVI, compression stockings or compression socks may alleviate the discomfort and swelling. Physicians usually use a 20-30mmHg compression stocking or a 20-30mmHg compression sock for this. The stockings will not make the varicosities go away, but is the least invasive treatment.

Chronic Venous Insufficiency

More serious cases of Chronic Venous Insufficiency require sclerotherapy, ablation, or surgical intervention such as stripping to correct the problematic vein. This is usually done by a vascular specialist or vascular surgeon. During sclerotherapy a chemical is injected in the affected vein or veins and a scar will form from the inside of the vein. During ablation a thin, flexible tube (catheter) with an electrode at the tip will heat the vein walls at the appropriate location to seal the vein. When a vein stripping is done one of the saphenous veins is removed. The physician will make a small incision in the groin area and usually another in the calf below the knee. The veins associated with the saphenous vein will be disconnected and tied off and the vein removed. There are other surgical procedures which are done to improve your leg health. After one of the above procedures 20-30mmHg compression stockings are usually put on and you are told to wear them for a certain length of time. Some physicians will tell their patients on their follow-up visit that it is no longer necessary to wear the compression garments. For me, this is where I have some concerns. If the real underlining cause of CVI (such as family history of varicose veins, being overweight, not exercising enough, smoking or sitting or standing for long periods of time) has not been corrected why would you not continue to wear compression stockings to keep from developing CVI again.

Compression stockings and socks have come a long way in the last few years. They no longer look like the garments our grandparents wore. They look like ordinary stockings and socks and can improve the quality of life. The stigma of wearing compression garments is in the past.

Let’s wear our compression stockings and socks to keep our legs looking great!

Vanda

http://www.supporthoseplus.com

WHY DO WE GET VARICIOSE VEINS

Varicose veins are the result of venous insufficiency. There are many things that influence the health of the veins in our legs. Among these are hereditary, obesity, sedate life styles, and of course, age. The population of the United States is getting older, the Baby Boomers are now in their 60’s, and, unfortunately many of us are over-weight (including Rod and Vanda).

heart_veins_arteries_circulculatory_system

The Heart is responsible for the blood flow in our bodies. The circulatory system is made up of the heart, arteries which carry blood from the heart to our legs and arms, arterioles and capillaries (where oxygen is exchanged), and veins which carry blood back to the heart. The heart is an excellent pump, but it needs assistance in getting blood flow from our legs and back to the heart. This is where the valves in our veins come in. The tiny valves in the veins open and close to allow blood to flow only one-way back to the heart. The problem occurs when the valves get damaged form age or from physical injuries to the leg and do not close properly. When the valves get damaged they cannot close properly and the blood can then back-flow and create pooling. This can cause stasis dermatitis, edema, and in severe cases blood clots or even lymphedema.

Now let’s discuss the particular vein diseases

spider_veins

Spider Veins

Spider veins are created by small dilations of the veins just below the skin. Yes, they are unsightly; they may cause your legs to ache.  They are giving you a warning to wear compression stockings to keep them under control so that varicose veins do not develop.

varicose-veins

Varicose Veins

Varicose veins are created by poor circulation in the venous system. They are generally ropy looking and if should be evaluated by your physician. If left untreated, they can lead to much more serious problems. With varicose veins the valves in the veins become incompetent and the function of returning blood to the heart has been compromised. This condition is called venous insufficiency and can have very serious consequences. Wearing your support hose can assist in maintaining control of the varicosities. There are also many physicians who can advise you of various medical treatments including oblation surgery.

stasis-dermatitis

Stasis Dermatitis

Is a red looking inflammatory skin disease that is common with people with chronic venous insufficiency. Again, wearing compression stockings will help maintain control of this disease, if left untreated it can lead to venous ulceration and lymphedema.

Venous Stasis Ulcer

Venous Stasis Ulcer

As you can tell venous diseases of the leg can become progressively worst. When you are experiencing leg problems always consult with your physician. They can direct you to wearing the correct compression stockings and can assist you in maintaining control of the disease.

For assistance in choosing a garment, call one of our Certified Fitters at 1-844-472-8807.

Thanks,

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

A Support Hose Story

One of our very good customers sent us a letter the other day that we would like to share with you.  She expressed what we have been telling our clients for a very long time.  What a difference support hose can make in a person’s life!  ….. Vanda

Untreated Stasis Dermatitis can lead to venous ulcerations

Untreated Stasis Dermatitis can lead to venous ulcerations (from Support Hose Plus)

“If I had just one piece of advice to give those who have extreme swelling in the lower limbs, it would be this – wear compression stockings and keep yourself and your loved ones out of wound care!

We always thought my husband had big legs.  Little did we know that his legs were simply swollen from lack of proper circulation.  It took 4 different doctors until we finally found one who took one look at his legs and diagnosed Venous Stasis Dermatitis as the cause for his dryness and swelling.  We didn’t know what this meant.  That doctor suggested my husband wear compression socks to rid his legs of the excess fluids, which, she said, would rid him of his Stasis Dermatitis.  So, to the Internet I went.

What I learned was this – whatever the cause, and there are many – if we did not get the swelling down quickly, we were looking at months of wound debridement and possible infections that would not be easily treated.  We searched and searched for the right compression socks, pharmacies, local health care dealers.  The first socks we bought were a diabetic sock, which is a great sock, but we soon found these did not have the proper compression to help my husband.  Within a few weeks, we noticed a wound that would not heal, just a few inches above his ankle on his left leg.  We were referred to the wound care center.

What followed were several months of compression wrapping and debridement (scraping) of his wound.  Nightly wound dressing and morning re-dressing is what we had in store for us for the next few months.

When we finally found the correct compression hose, 30-40mmHg, and found someone who would properly explain to us how to put them on, we were absolutely shocked to find that after wearing them daily for three weeks, my husband’s legs were not only NOT big, but were almost svelte.

I am a firm believer in these garments!  Almost a year later he has graduated into a lower compression garment, 20-30mmHg, and does not go one day without wearing them.  His overall health has gotten so much better as well.

Wear your stockings!  Don’t just think a water pill will be the only answer!  Compression is necessary because of the way we were all made.  Our valves in our veins are one-way only, and when they do not work properly, we must force them.

Do yourselves a favor – size your stockings correctly, wear the right compression, and do not go a day without them.  You will be surprised at how quickly and effectively compression socks work!

We are so very thankful to the good people at Support Hose Plus!  Without them, I shudder to think what would have happened to my husband’s legs!  Thank you Rod and Vanda.”

Getting Started with Vein Therapy (Part 5) – Support Hose in Everyday Life

Support Hose Store Juzo Freedom to Kick Start LifeDiet and Clothing

You can make a difference on your venous system by doing a few simple things which not only improve your leg health, but will ultimately help improve your overall health.

  • Diet – Make sure you eat plenty of fruits, vegetables (preferable raw) and whole grain products each day.
  • Water – Make sure you drink enough water. Adults need 2 liters of water daily.
  • Shoes – Wear shoes with flat heels and flexible soles.
  • Clothes – Avoid tight clothing that constricts in the pelvic and hip area. Control top garments decrease your circulation. Remember gradient compression is what it is all about. Unless you are a lymphedema patient, we want the most compression at the ankle. The compression should get less as it goes down toward the toes and up towards the torso.

Tips for work and everyday life

Support Hose Store Juzo Freedom to Kick Start Life Take the stairs – don’t use the elevator. In office buildings, in shopping centers…the opportunities are numerous. Take the stairs for the health of your veins
Keep the strain off the varicose veins Sit properly – put as little strain as possible on the underside of the thigh – do not let your legs dangle – a hard seat is preferable.
Take Pressure off Veins Running on the spot. If you stand a lot at work, try simply running on the spot from time to time. You can work while you are at it and take the strain off your veins at the same time.
Avoid heavy lifting. Heavy lifting – such as when shopping – pushes the blood back downwards and puts you veins under additional strain. Try to avoid heavy lifting – take a shopping bag on wheels.
You can do the following exercises sitting down without any trouble. If you work at a desk or seated at another type of workplace, you can keep you venous system on the go with a minimum of difficulty.
Rolling Your Feet Rolling your feet (right, left, in opposite directions).
Tiptoe exercise – with both feet on tiptoe at the same time.
Pulling your toes upwards is great exercise Pulling your toes upwards.
Rocking your feet from heel to toe alternately
Tips for Leisure Time
As a vein patient, you should organize your leisure time activities to benefit your venous system (regular exercise). Above all, this involves choosing the right sports, the right relaxation and specific gymnastic exercise.
Sport
Balanced and rhythmic exercise Balanced and rhythmic types of exercise and sports are recommended: walking, jogging, swimming, cycling, dancing, cross-country skiing.
No exercise with abrupt movements Sports with abrupt changes in movement are not recommended: Power sports and combatant sports, tennis and squash, downhill skiing and snowboard, ball sports.
Put your feet up Relaxation and sleep: When you are resting, put your feet up – about 15 cm higher than your heart.
Gymnastic exercises
Sit calmly and breathe Sit calmly and breathe, put your feet together and raise your heels until you are on tiptoe, then lower your heels to the floor again. Repeat this exercise up to 20 times.
Breath Calmly Supported on Arms Breathe calmly with both arms supported, stand on tiptoe and lower your heels to the floor again. Repeat this exercise up to 20 times.
Lean against wall Lean against a wall with your legs apart and your hands at shoulder height. Stand on tiptoe and lower your heels to floor again. Repeat this exercise up to 20 times.
Your legs moving with your support stockings on create a secondary pump to increase the venous circulation in your legs. Straddled position: as you breathe in, raise your arms to the side while going up on tiptoe. As you breathe out, go back to the straddled position. Repeat this exercise up to 20 times.

Remember your legs have to last you a lifetime. You can kick start your leg health with regular exercise and wear your support hose everyday.

Thanks for shopping at SupportHosePlus.com,

Vanda

Getting Started With Vein Therapy (Part3) – What is the Right Way to Handle My Compression Stockings?

pad

Support Hose Store Struggling with Stockings

Caring for Compression Stockings

Put your compression stockings on first thing in the morning, as your legs are not yet swollen at this stage. Your shower or bath should be taken the night before. In the evening after you have undressed, your compression stockings should be laundered. One reason is that the fabric becomes stretched out and loses pressure after being worn. The other reason is that the fabric collects flakes of skin, sweat, the remains of skin cream, etc. which may attack the threads and cause the fabric to lose its elasticity. Stockings should be laundered in hot water (about 107 degrees…this restores the memory of the yarn) using a non-phosphate detergent such as one sold by the major stocking manufacturers. Other non-phosphate detergents which can be bought at your local grocery store are ERA, Tide Free and All Free and Clear. Garments can hang dried over night. Most can be dried in the dryer using a delicate setting. Under no circumstances should you dry your compression stockings in the sun or on a radiator as this will damage the stockings and reduce their wear time.

HOW DO I PUT ON MY STOCKINGS?

Before putting on your compression stockings, it is best to take off your watch and jewelry and wear rubber gloves, such as the donning gloves sold at Support Hose Plus, to avoid damage to the fabric. The rubber gloves help grip to the fabric and make it much easier to hold and put on the stockings. When putting on the stockings, avoid overstretching by pulling excessively, as they will then not fit your leg properly. As a consequence, the pressure distribution will not be correct, and a full leg stocking will slip down like an elastic band and gather around the back of the knee. This can lead to your leg feeling strangled at the knee.
Donning StepsPutting stockings on with a butler or donner There are several donners that are manufactured and sold by Support Hose Plus to aid our less mobile or arthritic patients or those who are unable to bend to don stockings. It stretches the fabric, making it much easier to insert the foot. These include a standard size donner, extendable handle donner and large calf donner.

Using the metal donners from Support Hose Store Place your compression sock or stocking inside the semi-circle frame and pull the top of the stocking down over the semi-circle. The heel of the stocking must face the back of the metal stocking donner.
Step 2 of Using the metal donners from Support Hose Store Continue to slide the stocking down over the semi-circle. (It may be necessary to pull the heel farther down depending on foot and stocking size.)
Step 3 of Using the metal donners from Support Hose Store While sitting or holding on to the edge of a table to stabilize you, insert your foot into the stocking until your foot is completely on the floor. Helpful tip:hold the heel pocket against the frame as you slide your toes into the stocking.
Step 4 of Using the metal donners from Support Hose Store Grasp the handles of the donner and gently pull the stocking donner and stocking up the leg until the stocking is above the calf. Try not to over-stretch the stocking.
Step 5 of Using the metal donners from Support Hose Store Tilt the donner backward and down, free of the stocking
Step 6 of Using the metal donners from Support Hose Store Be sure the heel of the stocking is properly placed on the foot, then adjust the length and smooth out an wrinkles by stroking and smoothing with your donning gloves on .

Thigh high and waist high stockings can also be donned using your metal stocking donner with the lower leg applied in the same manner is a knee length and then pull the remaining portion into place by hand.

We certainly hope these hints will help you and make donning your stockings less stressful.

Getting Started With Vein Therapy (Part 2) – What do I need to know about compression therapy?

How Does a Compression Stocking Work?

It is easy to explain how a compression stocking works: the pressure of the stocking constricts the diameter of the vein.The venous valves can close again, thus reducing the amount of blood flowing back down into the legs. The smaller diameter of the veins means that the blood flows more quickly again, which prevents the formation of blood clots or thrombi.

The medically prescribed drop in pressure from the foot up to the thigh accelerates the flow of blood back to the heart. When the leg is moved, the stocking forms an external barrier for the muscles, which makes for a more effective muscle-pumping action.

Wearing a compression stocking is generally a very positive feeling because wearing a correctly fitted stocking has a noticeable relieving effect and helps your legs stay healthy. If you are experiencing a venous disease always consult with your physician. Your doctor can direct you to the correct compression class.

Compression stocking lengths Depending on the location of the damage to the veins and how far it has progressed, different lengths of compressions stockings are used. The assortment ranges from knee length stockings, thigh-high stockings and pantyhose. There are special models for women, men and women whom are pregnant.
Lengths of Compression Stockings

When must compression stockings be worn?

Compression stockings should be worn for various leg problems such as spider veins, varicose veins, chronic venous insufficiency, leg swelling, venous ulcers, and post surgical. A compression stocking must not be worn in the case of circulation disorders in leg arteries and in the case of heart complaints that are difficult to treat. Caution is also recommended in the case of sensory impairments due to diabetes and neuropathy (nerve damage).

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I WEAR MY COMPRESSION STOCKINGS?

Each and every day! There is simply no alternative if you want to achieve the best therapeutic results. Your stockings are absolutely indispensable if you stand or sit a lot. When you’re traveling, whether by car or plane, the stockings help prevent the blood clots that happen even to people with healthy veins when they are on the road. If you wear your stockings when you do your daily exercises or go for a walk, it promotes the development of muscle strength.