What is mmHg?

Many of you have asked what is mmHg or mm Hg (it is written both ways) when we talk about compression hose. “mmHg” stands for millimeters of Mercury. This measurement is the same measurement used to measure your blood pressure as well as the atmospheric pressure. It is the force per unit area exerted by an atmospheric column (that is, the entire body of air above the specified area). When you have a blood pressure reading, such as “120/80 mmHg,” we say it is “120 over 80 millimeters of mercury.” The top number, the systolic reading, measures arterial pressure during the heart’s contraction. The bottom diastolic number assesses arterial pressure when the heart is relaxing between beats, refilling itself with blood. When we talk about compression in garments, is usually expressed as a range, i.e. 20-30 mmHg. That is the range of pressure the garment is capable of exerting at the ankle dependent upon the measurements the fitter takes. Since the compression garments are gradient or graduated, the pressure gets less as it goes up the leg and less as it goes toward the toe.

Compression garments were developed when a person with lower extremity venous insufficiency (a condition  that occurs when the veins in the legs are not working effectively to pump blood from the legs back to the heart) realized that when they went into a body of water such as a swimming pool the increased pressure in the pool relieved the pain and discomfort from the venous condition. The deeper they progressed in the pool, the more relief they felt. From this discovery a very rudimentary wrap developed which reduced the swelling or edema and improved their quality of life.

Through the years, this rudimentary wrap has evolved into the wonderful compression garments we have today. They are available in many different compressions to accommodate the severity of disease. Compression classes
Support hose or support socks fit every lifestyle…from the sheerest, most fashionable stockings, or men’s dress socks to many types of athletic socks for both men and women. The stockings and socks are made of a wide variety of yarns which include nylon, wool, cotton, polyester, acrylic, and Lycra Spandex or Elasthan (Lacra Spandex or Elasthan is the yarn which give the garment its “stretchability”). All are knit in a manner to move the perspiration next to the skin to the outside of the garment so it can evaporate to keep you more comfortable. Many of our clients have several different styles of stockings and socks to fit their myriad lifestyles.

The stockings you wear with compression (mmHg) are not the old “supp hose” your grandmother use to wear. Call one of our Certified Fitters on our toll-free line, 1-844-472-8807, for assistance with the selection of new garments or go to  www.supporthoseplus.com

Here is to healthy legs,

Vanda Lancour

Let’s Keep Your Legs Looking Great

EnlargedVeinAndDamagedVein

Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI) is one of the leading causes of swollen feet, ankles, and legs. There are several things that can cause CVI. In CVI the butterfly valves which help blood move from the lower extremity back to the heart are damaged (incompetent) and do not close properly. Ultimately long-term blood pressure in the leg veins that is higher than normal causes CVI. Prolonged sitting or standing can stretch the superficial vein walls and damage the valves. Compression stockings and compression socks help the veins to close by applying a specific amount of pressure to the leg (this is the compression which your physician recommends). The compression stockings and compression socks also work with the muscles of the lower extremity to act as a secondary heart pump to move the blood out of the lower extremity and back to the heart.

  • Ankle swelling
  • Tight feeling calves
  • Heavy, tired, restless or achy legs
  • Pain while walking or shortly after stopping

At the end of the day, someone with CVI may experience only slight swelling and their legs may be tired and heavy. Now is the time to visit your physician and get some compression socks or compression stockings to keep the CVI from becoming worse.

  • Family history of varicose veins
  • Being overweight
  • Not exercising enough
  • Being pregnant
  • Smoking
  • Sitting or standing for long periods of time

If you have a parent who has had varicose veins, if you are overweight, or if you sit or stand for long periods of time, again now is the time to visit your physician and get some compression socks or compression stockings to keep the CVI from becoming worse.

CVI can be diagnosed by your physician by reviewing your patient history and a physical exam. The physician may also measure the blood pressure in your legs and examine any varicose veins you may have. To confirm a diagnosis of CVI, the physician will usually order a duplex ultrasound or a venogram. A duplex ultrasound uses sound waves to measure the speed of blood flow and visualizes the structure of the leg veins. A venogram is an x-ray that uses a dye (contrast) which enables the physician to see the veins.

Chronic venous insufficiency is usually not considered a health risk; your physician will try to decrease your pain and disability. In mild cases of CVI, compression stockings or compression socks may alleviate the discomfort and swelling. Physicians usually use a 20-30mmHg compression stocking or a 20-30mmHg compression sock for this. The stockings will not make the varicosities go away, but is the least invasive treatment.

Chronic Venous Insufficiency

More serious cases of Chronic Venous Insufficiency require sclerotherapy, ablation, or surgical intervention such as stripping to correct the problematic vein. This is usually done by a vascular specialist or vascular surgeon. During sclerotherapy a chemical is injected in the affected vein or veins and a scar will form from the inside of the vein. During ablation a thin, flexible tube (catheter) with an electrode at the tip will heat the vein walls at the appropriate location to seal the vein. When a vein stripping is done one of the saphenous veins is removed. The physician will make a small incision in the groin area and usually another in the calf below the knee. The veins associated with the saphenous vein will be disconnected and tied off and the vein removed. There are other surgical procedures which are done to improve your leg health. After one of the above procedures 20-30mmHg compression stockings are usually put on and you are told to wear them for a certain length of time. Some physicians will tell their patients on their follow-up visit that it is no longer necessary to wear the compression garments. For me, this is where I have some concerns. If the real underlining cause of CVI (such as family history of varicose veins, being overweight, not exercising enough, smoking or sitting or standing for long periods of time) has not been corrected why would you not continue to wear compression stockings to keep from developing CVI again.

Compression stockings and socks have come a long way in the last few years. They no longer look like the garments our grandparents wore. They look like ordinary stockings and socks and can improve the quality of life. The stigma of wearing compression garments is in the past.

Let’s wear our compression stockings and socks to keep our legs looking great!

Vanda

http://www.supporthoseplus.com

More Questions You Have Asked

Our clients have certainly given us some questions that need to be addressed. One of the main concerns seems to be that of being able to don and doff (put on and take off) their own compression stockings. Staying independent is important to all of us. One question that was asked is if there is a donner for support pantyhose similar to the one for knee high or thigh high support socks. Yes there is. However I do not recommend using it. I believe it is one thing to have one leg in a donner trying to pull up a support sock, but to have both legs involved in a donner I feel could lead to a nasty fall.

It seems everyone wants to know the easiest way to put on support pantyhose. I would like to share with you how I put my panty hose on. I wear 20-30 pantyhose and it takes me about 5 minutes and a bit of patience to put my stockings on in the morning. While it is not an easy task, it is really no more difficult than putting on a pair of knee high stockings. The hardest part of putting on any lower extremity compression garment is getting it over the heel. First I will repeat what I said last week, never gather the stocking. I use the Sigvaris Donning Gloves to put on my support pantyhose. I call them my “magic green gloves”. They enable arthritic hands to have better grasp. I use the little “nubbies” to pinch and pull the stockings up. They also protect my stockings from my fingernails. Even when I have the Sigvaris Donning Gloves on, I use only the balls of the finger tips to grasp the stockings.

First I sit down and with out my “magic green gloves” I pull the stockings on one leg as far as I can.  (For me, it is easier to start with the left leg.) Then I put on my gloves and pull the stocking up and over my heel and then up my leg as high above the knee as I can by pinching the garment and pulling it up. Then I start the other leg into the stocking and use the gloves in the same manner to pull the stocking up to the same level.

When I have them as high up my legs as I can get them while sitting down I remove the gloves, stand up, and pull the stockings up and over my tummy. Once this is accomplished, I put the gloves back on and start at the ankle of each leg and re-stretch the stockings by pinching and pulling all the way up the leg.

Then I take the gloves off and place my hands in the back of the stockings with my palms out. I push away from the body and lift up without grabbing the stockings. This seats the crotch of the pantyhose.

If the color or appearance of the stockings is uneven, I put on the gloves and use the flat of the hand to rub gently up or down the leg to adjust the stocking so it has an even appearance.

peel a banana3

Now that we have managed to put on stockings or socks, how are we going to get them off? I have had clients become so frustrated and panicked that they cut (yes, cut) a very expensive garment off. Same thing applies here as when putting on a compression garment…never gather the garment (or allow it to roll) when removing it. It becomes like the rubber band again and extremely difficult to remove. Instead start at the top and pull the garment down allowing the garment (it does not matter if it is a knee high, thigh high, or pantyhose) to slid on itself until you are able to pull it off your foot. The stocking slides on itself.  Peel your socks off just like you peel a banana.

If the “Peel a banana” method is not working for you, we have another option the Mediven Butler Off. The Butler Off looks similar to a shoe horn. There is a handle on top for pushing and a “tooth” to help push the garment off. The Butler Off is not meant for use with sheer support hose, but with more substantial garments. The Butler Off is not to be used to help push yourself up from a sitting position.

How to Use the Medi Butler Off for Removal of Stockings or SocksHow to use Medi Butler Off

  • Slide the tip of the horn under the top band of the stockings.
  • Now push the handle gently downwards: the far end of the horn slides down your calf and then over your heel. During the whole process the inner surface of the horn should remain in contact with your skin. At the same time the “tooth” helps push the stocking downwards. In order to regain contact with your skin you can start again with the horn a little higher and then continue with the downward movement if necessary.
  • As soon as you reach your heel lift your heel up. Then tilt the stick downwards a little to guide the horn along the underside of your foot. Caution: Make sure you do not press the stocking against the ground with the doffing aid. Otherwise the stocking may be damaged. Now push the handle forwards gently: the stockings slides off your foot, but stays on the horn.

There are more ways to don and doff compression stockings or support socks that these, but perhaps this will get you started. If you have comments or more questions, please click on the title of this newsletter, More Questions You Have Asked, scroll to the bottom of the blog, and leave your message as a guest.

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

 

The Newest (and Driest) Technology in Compression Socks

sweaty feetOur feet are the second sweatiest part of our body next to our armpits. The 250,000 sweat glands found on each foot can generate between half a cup and a cup of perspiration per day, depending on our level of activity. Unless this moisture is wicked away, our feet will become soggy and the skin soft and damp. Mushy skin becomes damaged a lot faster than dry skin. This is why 100% cotton socks are not a good choice. Cotton appears in a lot of less expensive socks. It absorbs more moisture than many other fibers, but loses all of its insulating ability when saturated, takes forever to dry, and will sag and bunch when wet. Socks which contain high percentages of cotton should be avoided.

Our socks take extreme wear and tear from our daily activities. They protect our feet from blisters and all the abuse we can deal out. Thus as we don (put on) our socks each day their job is to manage moisture and keep our feet dry. Their second job is to give enough padding to keep our feet warm or cool depending on conditions and our activity, and protect our feet from blisters.

Socks and the yarns which are used to knit them are probably one of the least thought about issues of our time. However, if our feet are not happy, we are not happy. The right socks make us feel good. Our manufacturers spend a lot of time and money on research looking for the best yarns to use to knit compression socks and compression stockings to make them both durable and effective. So let’s take some time to consider the yarns used to knit them.

Nylon and polyester are extremely durable. When a sock wears out the nylon is the last threads seen which are holding those favorite socks together. These synthetic, non-porous materials absorb very little water, dry quickly, and help give socks form and structure. Nylon and polyester themselves do not move moisture, but manufacturers apply a variety of coatings to the fibers to wick moisture away from our feet. (Dry feet are less susceptible to bacteria and fungus.) Examples of polyester and nylon socks are the Sigvaris Recovery SockSigvaris Performance SockTherafirm Core-Spun Knee High and Therafirm Core-Spun Cushioned Knee High, and the Sigvaris Performanace Sleeve.

Polyamide is a term often seen in socks. They are the basic fiber forming substances for nylon fiber. Polyamide was developed in the United States about 1935 and first used in stockings about 1940. Nylon fiber is fine, highly elastic, easy to wash, quick to dry and retains its shape well.

Acrylic is another commonly used synthetic material. It closely approximates the plushness of wool, while offering the increased durability of a synthetic. Other materials used include Lycra Spandex or Elasthan, which provide the hugging elastic. Please note that neither Spandex nor Elasthan contain rubber! In fact there are only a very few socks from our manufacturers that do contain rubber. All garments contain Spandex or Elasthan to give the support socks or support stockings the stretch. An example of socks with acrylic, nylon and Elasthan are the Therafirm Core-Spun.

Natural fibers would seem to be a good choice, but some have drawbacks. Cotton, as we have already discussed, is not a good choice. Wool manages moisture well, and wicks moisture away from your feet. Wool provides good padding and warmth, and can absorb up to a third of its weight in water without feeling damp or losing much of its insulating ability. Something you may not have known…wool regulates temperature well keeping feet cool as well as warm. However, wool is also less durable than most synthetic materials, and does not hold its shape well. So that we may have the best of both worlds (natural fibers and man made fibers) our manufacturers are now creating blends of fine wool, nylon, and spandex. Examples of the mix of fine Australian Merino Wool, nylon, and spandex mix are the Sigvaris Merino Wool and the Sigvaris Thermoregulating Wool .

Now last, but by no means least is a patented, intimate blend of synthetic and natural fibers that accelerates the water release rate of wet fabric. Dri-Release® is a micro blend performance yarn that feels like cotton. Rather than just spreading moisture across its surface, Dri-Release® actually pushes moisture to the outside of a garment, releasing water and perspiration. Tests show it dries four times faster than cotton and faster than any other performance fabric on the market. Dri-Release® is the preferred performance fabric for athletes all over the world. The unparalleled performance and moisture transferring qualities of Dri-Release® help these many athletes perform at the top of their game every time. One of the socks we have previously mentioned, Sigvaris Recovery Sock, is an example of a sock containing the Dri-Release® yarn.

In conclusion if shopping for what many of us call support hose, compression hosiery, support socks and many other names, a garment with high contents of synthetic fibers will tend to give us longer wear, provide wicking action to remove moisture from our feet and provide ample padding. Top of this list of synthetic fibers is the new yarn which was developed Optimar called Dri-Release®. It is the very same yarn used in socks worn in bicycle races and triathlons by well know athletes. Socks containing wool are also a good choice because it is  thermo regulating, moisture wicking, insulating, breathable, and durable. 


Happy Activities,

Vanda
SupportHosePlus.com

WHY DO WE GET VARICIOSE VEINS

Varicose veins are the result of venous insufficiency. There are many things that influence the health of the veins in our legs. Among these are hereditary, obesity, sedate life styles, and of course, age. The population of the United States is getting older, the Baby Boomers are now in their 60’s, and, unfortunately many of us are over-weight (including Rod and Vanda).

heart_veins_arteries_circulculatory_system

The Heart is responsible for the blood flow in our bodies. The circulatory system is made up of the heart, arteries which carry blood from the heart to our legs and arms, arterioles and capillaries (where oxygen is exchanged), and veins which carry blood back to the heart. The heart is an excellent pump, but it needs assistance in getting blood flow from our legs and back to the heart. This is where the valves in our veins come in. The tiny valves in the veins open and close to allow blood to flow only one-way back to the heart. The problem occurs when the valves get damaged form age or from physical injuries to the leg and do not close properly. When the valves get damaged they cannot close properly and the blood can then back-flow and create pooling. This can cause stasis dermatitis, edema, and in severe cases blood clots or even lymphedema.

Now let’s discuss the particular vein diseases

spider_veins

Spider Veins

Spider veins are created by small dilations of the veins just below the skin. Yes, they are unsightly; they may cause your legs to ache.  They are giving you a warning to wear compression stockings to keep them under control so that varicose veins do not develop.

varicose-veins

Varicose Veins

Varicose veins are created by poor circulation in the venous system. They are generally ropy looking and if should be evaluated by your physician. If left untreated, they can lead to much more serious problems. With varicose veins the valves in the veins become incompetent and the function of returning blood to the heart has been compromised. This condition is called venous insufficiency and can have very serious consequences. Wearing your support hose can assist in maintaining control of the varicosities. There are also many physicians who can advise you of various medical treatments including oblation surgery.

stasis-dermatitis

Stasis Dermatitis

Is a red looking inflammatory skin disease that is common with people with chronic venous insufficiency. Again, wearing compression stockings will help maintain control of this disease, if left untreated it can lead to venous ulceration and lymphedema.

Venous Stasis Ulcer

Venous Stasis Ulcer

As you can tell venous diseases of the leg can become progressively worst. When you are experiencing leg problems always consult with your physician. They can direct you to wearing the correct compression stockings and can assist you in maintaining control of the disease.

For assistance in choosing a garment, call one of our Certified Fitters at 1-844-472-8807.

Thanks,

Vanda
www.supporthoseplus.com

A Support Hose Story

One of our very good customers sent us a letter the other day that we would like to share with you.  She expressed what we have been telling our clients for a very long time.  What a difference support hose can make in a person’s life!  ….. Vanda

Untreated Stasis Dermatitis can lead to venous ulcerations

Untreated Stasis Dermatitis can lead to venous ulcerations (from Support Hose Plus)

“If I had just one piece of advice to give those who have extreme swelling in the lower limbs, it would be this – wear compression stockings and keep yourself and your loved ones out of wound care!

We always thought my husband had big legs.  Little did we know that his legs were simply swollen from lack of proper circulation.  It took 4 different doctors until we finally found one who took one look at his legs and diagnosed Venous Stasis Dermatitis as the cause for his dryness and swelling.  We didn’t know what this meant.  That doctor suggested my husband wear compression socks to rid his legs of the excess fluids, which, she said, would rid him of his Stasis Dermatitis.  So, to the Internet I went.

What I learned was this – whatever the cause, and there are many – if we did not get the swelling down quickly, we were looking at months of wound debridement and possible infections that would not be easily treated.  We searched and searched for the right compression socks, pharmacies, local health care dealers.  The first socks we bought were a diabetic sock, which is a great sock, but we soon found these did not have the proper compression to help my husband.  Within a few weeks, we noticed a wound that would not heal, just a few inches above his ankle on his left leg.  We were referred to the wound care center.

What followed were several months of compression wrapping and debridement (scraping) of his wound.  Nightly wound dressing and morning re-dressing is what we had in store for us for the next few months.

When we finally found the correct compression hose, 30-40mmHg, and found someone who would properly explain to us how to put them on, we were absolutely shocked to find that after wearing them daily for three weeks, my husband’s legs were not only NOT big, but were almost svelte.

I am a firm believer in these garments!  Almost a year later he has graduated into a lower compression garment, 20-30mmHg, and does not go one day without wearing them.  His overall health has gotten so much better as well.

Wear your stockings!  Don’t just think a water pill will be the only answer!  Compression is necessary because of the way we were all made.  Our valves in our veins are one-way only, and when they do not work properly, we must force them.

Do yourselves a favor – size your stockings correctly, wear the right compression, and do not go a day without them.  You will be surprised at how quickly and effectively compression socks work!

We are so very thankful to the good people at Support Hose Plus!  Without them, I shudder to think what would have happened to my husband’s legs!  Thank you Rod and Vanda.”

Secrets of the Best Fitters

Your day does not have to start with struggling to put on your support stockings

Your morning should not have to start like this

Support Hose Tricks We Want You to Know

We all know how much better our legs feel when we wear our support hose and how our quality of life is improved.  Your day does not have to start with struggling to put on your support stockings.

However, many of our customers confess:  “I hate to put on my support stockings because it takes so long” or “I am so tired when I finish putting on my support socks”.  Putting on your compression stockings really does not have to be such a an ordeal as our stocking donning lady appears to be experiencing.

Be sure to put your stockings on first thing in the morning before your legs and feet have a chance to swell.  If necessary, take your bath or shower the night before.  The important trick here is to make sure your legs are dry when you put your stockings on.  This means you may have to put lotion on your legs the night before also.  Let’s make this as easy a possible.

There is a saying “a picture is worth a thousand words”, our good friends at Jobst have gone a step further.
They have created a video which shows proper techniques of putting on your compression stockings without using any type of donning aid and how to use the Jobst Donner.  We hope this video brought to you by Support Hose Plus and Jobst will make your morning more pleasant.

Vanda

 

Compression Stockings 101

Gradient Compression Support Hose — What are they?
This month we are answering one of our customers most frequently asked questions. If you have questions or comments, please go to our blog www.askvanda.com. Each and every question or comment will be addressed.

To begin, we will discuss diseases, which started your leg or arm problems. Venous diseases start by a feeling of heaviness, a tired feeling in your legs or a discoloration or swelling. Minor pain may be felt. This may be the result of insufficient blood flow back to the heart as blood pools or congests in the legs. When you see warning signs of venous diseases the first step is to see your doctor. But, before you do you may want to become an informed patient. We are supplying you with information and resource links on venous diseases and compression therapy. This newsletter and information provided in the links are not intended to be a substitute for your physician’s medical advice and treatment. Your Doctor is the best source of information on venous diseases. Here is a special list on symptoms you may want to take with you when you see your Doctor:
 Tired legs at night
 Heavy legs at night
 Shoe feels tight at night
 Swollen legs in the morning
 Swollen legs in the afternoon
 Swollen legs at night
 Swelling is gone in the morning
 Leg pain from prolonged sitting
 Dull, aching pain in leg
 Tingling, numbness burning
or cramping in the legs and feet
 Legs “fall asleep” often
 Spider veins
 Varicose veins
 More than one pregnancy (even though
varicose veins, swelling and pain may
disappear after giving birth, problems
may occur later in life)
 Pregnant
 Discoloration of the skin
 Hardened skin on the lower leg
 Patches of dry skin on the lower leg
 Open sores on the lower leg
 Ulcers on the lower leg
 Family history of venous disease
 Diabetes

Varicose Veins: Varicose veins are veins that become visible, primarily in your legs, as enlarged or twisted superficial veins. As your legs move the leg muscles push on the veins which activate tiny valves in your legs to pump the blood back to the heart. The veins become enlarged when the valves fail to work and allow the blood to pool in the legs. Varicose veins are frequently painful, itchy and look unsightly. If left untreated they can lead to much more serious problems. Compression therapy assists in the management of varicose veins by applying a gradient compression to the leg and assisting the muscles in moving blood back to the heart.

Lymphedema: A swelling primarily in the legs and arms resulting from the lymphatic vessels being unable to transport the protein rich lymph fluid back into your circulatory system. You can be born with this problem or it can be the result of injury or surgery. When the lymphatic system is not functional, fluid can build up which results in swelling or thickening of the skin. There is no cure for lymphedema, but it can be managed. The lymphatic drainage system must be opened through MLD (Manual Lymphatic Drainage) therapy. The compression stockings/arm sleeves/gloves can then be used to exert a constant pressure on the affected area to maintain the reduction achieved through MLD therapy. This in turn assists in the drainage of the lymphatic system to minimize the swelling.

Gradient compression: There are several levels of gradient compression support stockings. Gradient compression is measured in millimeters compression mercury. Please note that not all hose are a gradient compression. Gradient compression reduces swelling and helps prevent pooling of blood in the legs, by delivering the highest level of compression at the ankle and gently decreasing up the leg. Improving blood flow helps the wearer experience immediate relief from tired, aching legs. Generally support stockings come in 8-15mmHg, 16-20mmHg, 20-30mmHg, 30-40mmHg and 40-50mmHg.

The symptoms determine the amount of compression, as follows:

  • 8-15 mmHg Compression:
    • Feel good therapy for tired, achy legs
    • Minor ankle, leg and foot swelling
  • 16-20 mmHg Compression:
    • Minor varicosities
    • Minor varicosities during pregnancy
    • Tired, aching legs
    • Minor ankle, leg and foot swelling
    • Post Sclerotherapy
  • 20-30 mmHg Compression:
    • Moderate edema
    • Post Sclerotherapy
    • Help prevent recurrence of ulcerations
    • Post surgical
    • Moderate to severe varicosities
    • Moderate to severe varicosities during pregnancy
  • 30-40 mmHg Compression:
    • Severe varicosities
    • Severe edema
    • Lymphatic edema
    • Post surgical
    • Orthostatic Hypotension
    • Post Sclerotherapy
    • Management of active venous ulcerations
    • Helps to prevent recurrence of venous ulcerations
    • Helps to prevent post-thrombotic syndrome
    • Manage manifestations of PTS (post-thrombotic syndrome)
    • CVD/CVI (Cardio-vascular disease/insufficiency)

At Support Hose Plus we carry the four leading manufacturers of gradient compression stockings, Jobst, Medi, Juzo and Sigvaris. All four of these manufacturers have true gradient compression in the stockings.

Compression hose are available in three basis styles, knee-high, thigh-high and waist-high (pantyhose). Your physician will generally advise you which style to purchase. Depending upon where the problem is occurring in your legs will determine which style is best for you. Your comfort and life style will also determine which hose to consider. The support stockings are available in many styles and thickness ranging from sheer to very heavy. Some of the socks are available especially for diabetic foot-wear (well padded, thick stocking). There are socks available as a dress socks, athletic socks, silver socks (anti-odor, antibacterial and anti-fungal to help heal wounds)and even garments with 100% cotton skin contact. Whether you are looking for knee-high, thigh-high or waist-high (pantyhose) we have the hose that is right for you.

When you are experiencing venous insufficiency, edema, or lymphedema it is always best to first consult with your Health Care Provider. If they recommend support stockings please consult with SuportHosePlus.com as we are compression garment specialists. We carry all four major manufacturers, Jobst, Mediven, Sigvaris and Juzo, so we know we can fit you in the most appropriate stockings for your medical needs. Our customer service representatives are Certified Fitters and are available to assist you on our toll-free number 1-844-472-8807 . They will attempt to answer any questions you may have.

Thank-you for shopping at SupportHosePlus.com,
Vanda